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Black Nationalist Statues Must Fall

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#1
There are streets, schools and parks across the country named after a violent racist who urged the KKK to murder civil rights activists and claimed that racial integration was a Jewish conspiracy.

There’s a boulevard in Brooklyn named after a racist who admired Hitler and boasted of being the first fascist. Harvard has a prominent institute named after a bigot who defended Nazi bigotry.

New York City, Washington D.C. and Los Angeles all have streets named after a supremacist and nationalist who palled around with Nazis. New York City has a statue of him. Washington D.C. has an art tribute to him. If we are going to take down Confederate memorials, there’s no way he can stay up.

He must fall.

In 1961, Malcolm X introduced George Lincoln Rockwell, the leader of the American Nazi Party, on stage at a Nation of Islam rally. After Rockwell made a donation to the racist black nationalist hate group, Malcom X led a round of applause for the Neo-Nazi leader and called him, “Mr. Rockwell.”

There’s been a recent effort in Bethesda to rename Winston Churchill High School after Malcolm X. How can you rename a school honoring the leader who defeated Nazism after Malcolm, a Nazi collaborator?

Malcolm X wasn’t breaking any new ground by palling around with Nazis. There had been a longstanding alliance between black nationalist and white nationalist groups which shared a common belief in the racial inferiority of other races, opposition to the Civil Rights Movement and anti-Semitism.

The head of the American Nazi Party had described Nation of Islam boss Elijah Muhammad as “the Adolf Hitler of the black man.”


Malcolm X had previously met with the KKK. The Muslim racist bonded with the Nazi racist over anti-Semitism. "The Jew is behind the integration movement, using the Negro as a tool," Malcolm X told him.

Malcolm X’s Klan meeting was part of an alliance between the Nation of Islam and the KKK in opposition to the Civil Rights Movement. The Nation of Islam received protection for its mosques from the Klan.

J.B. Stoner, the KKK leader he met with, would be convicted of the bombing of the Bethel Baptist Church in Birmingham. The bombing had taken place three years before their meeting.

Malcolm X had even urged the KKK to eliminate “traitors who assisted integration leaders". The man after whom streets all over the country have been named was urging the KKK to kill civil rights workers.

"I sat at the table myself with the heads of the Ku Klux Klan," Malcolm X later admitted. "From that day onward the Klan never interfered with the Black Muslim movement in the South."

There's a statue of Malcolm X at the Audubon Ballroom in New York. It's some 40 blocks up from Malcolm X Boulevard. The Champions for Humanity Monument in Oakland's Kaiser Memorial Park includes Malcolm X. There’s a Marcus Garvey/Malcolm X installation in Washington D.C.

They must come down.

Wesleyan University hosts Malcolm X House. Berkeley has the Malcolm X Elementary School. San Francisco has the Malcolm X Academy. They must be renamed.

Rest of the article is at the link: http://freedomoutpost.com/black-nationalist-statues-must-fall/
 
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#2
Thanks for the post. Now, I wonder how accurate the article is.
 
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Willie T

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It's tempting to jump on the band wagon. And perhaps on a day when I was feeling a little meaner, I might do just that. But, today, just because some Blacks are behaving badly, I don't feel I have to be a turkey too.
 
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Malcolm X wasn’t breaking any new ground by palling around with Nazis. There had been a longstanding alliance between black nationalist and white nationalist groups which shared a common belief in the racial inferiority of other races, opposition to the Civil Rights Movement and anti-Semitism.
The point is that Malcom X turned against hatred and racial separation, later writing about his experiences:

As a former member and speaker for the Nation of Islam, a black spiritual and nationalist movement, he believed that the white man was the devil and the black man superior.

After leaving the Nation of Islam in March 1964, he made Hajj, which helped change his perspective on whites and racism completely.

"There were tens of thousands of pilgrims, from all over the world. They were of all colors, from blue-eyed blondes to black-skinned Africans. But we were all participating in the same ritual, displaying a spirit of unity and brotherhood that my experiences in America had led me to believe never could exist between the white and the non-white.

You may be shocked by these words coming from me. But on this pilgrimage, what I have seen, and experienced, has forced me to rearrange much of my thought patterns previously held, and to toss aside some of my previous conclusions. This was not too difficult for me. Despite my firm convictions, I have been always a man who tries to face facts, and to accept the reality of life as new experience and new knowledge unfolds it. I have always kept an open mind, which is necessary to the flexibility that must go hand in hand with every form of intelligent search for truth.

During the past eleven days here in the Muslim world, I have eaten from the same plate, drunk from the same glass and slept in the same bed (or on the same rug)-while praying to the same God with fellow Muslims, whose eyes were the bluest of the blue, whose hair was the blondest of blond, and whose skin was the whitest of white. And in the words and in the actions and in the deeds of the ‘white' Muslims, I felt the same sincerity that I felt among the black African Muslims of Nigeria, Sudan and Ghana.

We are truly all the same-brothers."

https://www.soundvision.com/article/hajj-as-a-shift-against-racism-malcolm-xs-letter-from-hajj

He broke with Elijah Muhammed, and was condemned by him as an apostate. It was for this change of heart, and his speaking out against hatred, that Malcolm X was assassinated by several members of the cult he formerly followed. He knew he was marked for death. He told an interviewer that he had a good idea of who was assigned to kill him. He died speaking out for the brotherhood of all men, gunned down as he preached his understanding of racial equality and brotherhood.

His story is one of moving from crime to religious hatred to a final revelation that racism is evil and contrary to God's will. Yeah, a statue is the least we can do. If David Duke or any other of Trump's supporters had a similar revelation, they should be honored as well.
 
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I know little of Malcolm X, but considering that His so-called prophet, Muhammad, might have been white of skin, why did his change in racial perspective come later? Maybe he thought Muhammad was an albino Arab. Still, albinos are very white.

 
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The point is that Malcom X turned against hatred and racial separation, later writing about his experiences:

As a former member and speaker for the Nation of Islam, a black spiritual and nationalist movement, he believed that the white man was the devil and the black man superior.

After leaving the Nation of Islam in March 1964, he made Hajj, which helped change his perspective on whites and racism completely.

"There were tens of thousands of pilgrims, from all over the world. They were of all colors, from blue-eyed blondes to black-skinned Africans. But we were all participating in the same ritual, displaying a spirit of unity and brotherhood that my experiences in America had led me to believe never could exist between the white and the non-white.

You may be shocked by these words coming from me. But on this pilgrimage, what I have seen, and experienced, has forced me to rearrange much of my thought patterns previously held, and to toss aside some of my previous conclusions. This was not too difficult for me. Despite my firm convictions, I have been always a man who tries to face facts, and to accept the reality of life as new experience and new knowledge unfolds it. I have always kept an open mind, which is necessary to the flexibility that must go hand in hand with every form of intelligent search for truth.

During the past eleven days here in the Muslim world, I have eaten from the same plate, drunk from the same glass and slept in the same bed (or on the same rug)-while praying to the same God with fellow Muslims, whose eyes were the bluest of the blue, whose hair was the blondest of blond, and whose skin was the whitest of white. And in the words and in the actions and in the deeds of the ‘white' Muslims, I felt the same sincerity that I felt among the black African Muslims of Nigeria, Sudan and Ghana.

We are truly all the same-brothers."

https://www.soundvision.com/article/hajj-as-a-shift-against-racism-malcolm-xs-letter-from-hajj

He broke with Elijah Muhammed, and was condemned by him as an apostate. It was for this change of heart, and his speaking out against hatred, that Malcolm X was assassinated by several members of the cult he formerly followed. He knew he was marked for death. He told an interviewer that he had a good idea of who was assigned to kill him. He died speaking out for the brotherhood of all men, gunned down as he preached his understanding of racial equality and brotherhood.

His story is one of moving from crime to religious hatred to a final revelation that racism is evil and contrary to God's will. Yeah, a statue is the least we can do. If David Duke or any other of Trump's supporters had a similar revelation, they should be honored as well.
I'm glad you posted this. Anyone who has studied Malcolm X would know he had a change of heart as it relates to racism late in his life. But I assume the original post was done out of ignorance and being rather dishonest. Racial inequality was something that was fiercely being fought over during that time, and Malcolm X was one who stood strongly against the white supremacist system that oppressed black people and their communities. Great post but I assume this will turn to a right left name calling thread
 
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I know little of Malcolm X, but considering that His so-called prophet, Muhammad, might have been white of skin, why did his change in racial perspective come later? Maybe he thought Muhammad was an albino Arab. Still, albinos are very white.

Jesus might have been black as He walked here in the flesh! But I know the white supremacist perspective won't change regardless
 

Willie T

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I know I never saw any of these late-in-life "change of heart" writings some of you mentioned. But. I sure did hear at least a hundred times of his spewing his hatred on TV.

Now.......... in the same vein, what do any of you know of the personal feelings of any of the men those statues were dedicated to, as they grew older in their lives. I know at least one of them was hired by the Northern Government.
 
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I'm glad you posted this. Anyone who has studied Malcolm X would know he had a change of heart as it relates to racism late in his life. But I assume the original post was done out of ignorance and being rather dishonest.
I would not care to say why it was done. I'm merely pointing out that Malcolm X had a change of heart and redeemed himself from racism and hatred.

It's a particularly American story.

Racial inequality was something that was fiercely being fought over during that time, and Malcolm X was one who stood strongly against the white supremacist system that oppressed black people and their communities.
He no longer wanted to replace white supremacy with black supremacy, arguing from the heart that race didn't matter to God.

Great post but I assume this will turn to a right left name calling thread
I hope not. We should all be proud of him for giving his life to combat racism, be it by whites or blacks. Other than the white supremacists, black supremacists, and nazis, who else would find that offensive?
 
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I know little of Malcolm X, but considering that His so-called prophet, Muhammad, might have been white of skin, why did his change in racial perspective come later? Maybe he thought Muhammad was an albino Arab. Still, albinos are very white.

David is great at explaining true islam.
 
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I know I never saw any of these late-in-life "change of heart" writings some of you mentioned.
It's a fact. He died because he opposed the racism of Elijah Muhammed. He new it was coming, too.

He was born Malcolm Little, an Omaha Negro preacher's son. Before he was out of his teens, he was Big Red, a Harlem hipster trafficking in numbers, narcotics, sex, and petty crime. He was buried as Al Hajj Malik Shabazz, a spiritual desperado lost between the peace of Islam and the pain of blackness. His whole life was a series of provisional identities, and he was still looking for the last when, as Malcolm X, 39, apostate Black Muslim and mercurial black nationalist, he was gunned to death by black men last week in a dingy uptown New York ballroom.

He had seen the end coming?predicted it, in fact, so long and so loudly that people had stopped listening. Malcolm X had always been an extravagant talker, a demagogue who titillated slum Negroes and frightened whites with his blazing racist attacks on the “white devils” and his calls for an armed American Mau Mau. His own flamboyant past made it easy to disregard his dire warnings that he had been marked for murder by the Muslims, the anti-white, anti- integrationist Negro sect he had served so devoutly for a dozen years and fought so bitterly since his defection a year ago.

His assassination turned out to be one of his few entirely accurate prophecies. Its fulfillment triggered an ominous vendetta between the Malcolmites and the Muslims?ominous in its intensity even though it was isolated on the outermost extremist fringe of American Negro life.
Newsweek


What they didn't report was why he had broken from the Nation of Islam.

By March 1964, Malcolm X had grown disillusioned with the Nation of Islam and its leader Elijah Muhammad. Expressing many regrets about his time with them, which he had come to regard as largely wasted, he embraced Sunni Islam. After a period of travel in Africa and the Middle East, which included completing the Hajj, he also became known as el-Hajj Malik el-Shabazz. He repudiated the Nation of Islam, disavowed racism and founded Muslim Mosque, Inc. and the Organization of Afro-American Unity. He continued to emphasize Pan-Africanism, black self-determination, and black self-defense.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malcolm_X

But. I sure did hear at least a hundred times of his spewing his hatred on TV.
The media loved that. He scared a lot of people. The story of his redemption and rejection of racism just didn't get much play, as you see.

That's why his memory is worth keeping. In the end, he rejected hate and embrace all men as brothers. As I said, an particularly American story.
 
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I know little of Malcolm X, but considering that His so-called prophet, Muhammad, might have been white of skin, why did his change in racial perspective come later?
It was tough being black in the 50s. He was bright and poor and turned to a life of crime until the Nation of Islam gave him something to believe. Later, he realized that racial hate could not be the answer. As he wrote, his pilgrimage to Mecca showed him that all races could be together in peace. The point was that it didn't matter what race Muhammad was. And that realization brought him peace.

He accepted that he was marked for death,and still refused to stop denouncing racism by anyone, white or black. Why shouldn't we be proud of him?
 
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Now.......... in the same vein, what do any of you know of the personal feelings of any of the men those statues were dedicated to, as they grew older in their lives. I know at least one of them was hired by the Northern Government.
Longstreet in particular, accepted a position in the government and tried to make reconciliation possible. Do you suppose that's why we see so few statues of Longstreet? He was Lee's exec, a trusted friend "my old war horse", Lee called him. And yet he's been treated rather shabbily by may southern historians because of his willingness to take part in the reconstruction.

His well-known disagreement with Lee over a frontal assault on the Union center at Gettysburg (in spite of that, he took command of the operation and did his level best to make it work) did him no good, either.

 

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Gosh, I didn't even know they had movie cameras back during the civil war... let alone that they filmed documentaries.
 
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Yet outside of a roadside sign near his birthplace in Edgefield, South Carolina, one statue in Gainesville, Georgia, where he died, and his name on a few streets in a handful of Southern towns, there are virtually no memorials to Longstreet throughout the South -- or the entire country, for that matter.
A World II tank was named after Stuart. Military bases are named after Braxton Bragg, John Bell Hood and eight other Confederate generals.
"Stonewall" Jackson's visage is carved on Stone Mountain outside Atlanta. But few people, apart from ardent Civil War buffs, have ever heard of Longstreet.
At a time of debate over the removal of Confederate monuments and amid charges that some protestors want to "erase history," Longstreet's near-expungement raises questions about whose history is being scrubbed away and why that history was created in the first place. It underscores that history -- and particularly the history of the Civil War -- is not simply an objective chronicling of facts. It is often shaped by people to promote particular political agendas and ideologies.

Despite his distinguished war record, Longstreet's absence from the pantheon of Confederate heroes was no accident. It was the result of a deliberate campaign by Southerners to punish him for his actions following the war.
After the end of the war, Longstreet eventually settled in New Orleans. There, unlike many of his compatriots, he spoke out in favor of Reconstruction. He became a Republican. He endorsed Ulysses S. Grant -- who was reviled by Southerners -- for president in 1868. In 1874, he had the temerity to lead a predominantly black force of state militia in pitched gun battles against white supremacists in the streets of New Orleans. To many in the South, these efforts branded Longstreet a traitor to the white race to be either vilified -- or forgotten.
"He was nearly erased from Confederate history," says William Garrett Piston, professor emeritus of history at Missouri State University, who wrote a biography of Longstreet. "There were complicated circumstances. But at the bottom it was because of the fact that Longstreet shocked and outraged white Southerners, because he was willing to participate in biracial politics."

http://www.cnn.com/2017/08/23/opini...-general-longstreet-opinion-holmes/index.html

So this statue thing has a longer history than some people think.
 
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Gosh, I didn't even know they had movie cameras back during the civil war... let alone that they filmed documentaries.
I learned Civil War history from an historian who learned from Shelby Foote. Gettysburg is a remarkably accurate and realistic depiction.

My major complaint is that no one used explosive shot at the time, as the film suggests. I suppose cannonballs bouncing around smashing bodies, and grapeshot shredding them was just too much for such a film.
 

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https://www.biography.com/people/malcolm-x-9396195?_escaped_fragment_=
https://www.counterpunch.org/2015/0...in-the-struggle-against-racism-and-injustice/

The second one is more thorough and it's clear from both articles that Malcom's philosophy underwent a transformation. To what extent is difficult to know without further study. He did agree with some of the ideas of King and also did reject some of his earlier ways of thinking. He never really got a chance to develop his new ideas as he was killed at a young age of 39. He was killed by Talmadge X Hayer who was a radical member of the Nation of Islam . Hayer told his parole board that, he wanted to kill Malcolm X because of his inflammatory comments about the Nation's founder. Read more here: http://www.cnn.com/2010/CRIME/04/26/malcolmx.killer/index.html
 

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That said, If Confederate statutes must come down in spite of the changes of attitude that came later (many went on to serve the Union with distinction) then any memorials or statutes of Malcom X must come down for the same reason. Before his philosophy changed, he was a vile man that spewed a lot of people to hate.
 
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