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HIGH VOLTAGE EXPERIMENTS

Joined
Jul 5, 2011
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13,662
#41
You could form an industry, Hermit. I admire your commitment and passion.

I'm contemplating a project for a program. I have in mind a childhood fantasy:
1. A detonator, radio frequency controlled or timed. or,
2. Point of Cut detector (wire break sensor)
3. AC ways
etc
 

JohnDB

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#42
Static electricity (including lightning) is extremely high voltage. And any hope of storage of the electrons on a capacitor are slim. Current flows from negative to positive. It doesn't like to be stored.
 
Joined
Apr 26, 2015
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#43
Thanks, Classik.
... your commitment and passion...
Without the passion there is no commitment. Passion is the heart of creativity, and the will to find solutions.
I hope you find and hold onto your passion, so you too can be committed to follow through with your project for a program.
 
Joined
Apr 26, 2015
Messages
597
Christian
Yes
#44
Static electricity (including lightning) is extremely high voltage. And any hope of storage of the electrons on a capacitor are slim. Current flows from negative to positive. It doesn't like to be stored.
Lightning starts of as static electricity, for instance (- earth, + cloud). Once the gap is broken an arc flashes across and it becomes (+earth, -cloud). That same arc now goes back the other way. So in a lightning flash there is a sort of AC happening for up to two seconds (longest flashes).

My imagination is this that a sort of high voltage and amperage bridge diode allowing a huge battery (like a purpose built battery the size of a pond or lake) to charge it up. But we do not have anything (yet) to even instantly charge a small battery.
 
Joined
Apr 26, 2015
Messages
597
Christian
Yes
#45
Here is a strange story. Still unable to figure it out. A few months after these experiments, I relocated to a new residence some 500 miles away. I packed everything up with the rest of our stuff and moved everything in a few trips there and back. We lived in a huge tent for a month while a kit home got erected. After we unpacked everything I discovered that my Tesla Coil was missing. I was beside myself. I could not understand how I missed that. On the last trip to the new location everything in the old house, yard and garage was completely empty. My only thoughts are that it disappeared at the original home sometime between a trip to our new place.

So, to carry on with my experiments, I had to make another Tesla coil. This time I decided to build a vertical secondary coil with the primary coil at the bottom. This type is a common design used by others. However, I decided to change the shape of the primary coil to fan out as it rose in height to keep the air gap sufficient as the voltage increases up the secondary coil.

I have no photos of this wonderful coil. But here is a sketch of it from a note book I had with me.



I have a creative mind and I figure out a lot of stuff in note books. Right now, in my place I have about eight note books floating around the house. At least one in every room. Most of the time I never refer to them, because I already know what's in them. It is the time taken to figure things out, write and draw them which helps me to keep them (branded) in my mind.

Later, I will explain a few experiments used by this coil.
 
Joined
Apr 26, 2015
Messages
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Christian
Yes
#46
The single pole TC as above means that the arc discharge is free to wonder around to find a path to its opposite polarities, which ideally would be earth/ground. The TC terminal was made from annealing two aluminium bowls into an all round shape and joined together to make a sphere. It ended up looking more oval than circular, but it did the job very well. When I first used this coil, the arc was initially mediocre in length, but after a while it started to grow longer. I later learnt from Tesla's notes that the spheroid terminal builds up a capacitance which adds to the discharge even more so. The maximum arc from this TC reached about a meter (about 1 million volts AC).

To have the arc directed was to attract it to a nearing earth/ground potential, like a nearby rod connected to the earth. This led me wanting to use an earth lead itself as the opposing terminal. So I made a hand terminal with an earth lead plugged into the back of the probe. With this lead, I was drawing out the arc from different angles to see if there were any differences in arc length.



As shown above, I was drawing the arc out to its maximum distance when suddenly the earth lead unplugged itself from the probe. As the lead was falling I noticed an arc of about six inches long came out of my hand. It bridged between my hand and the falling lead. My first thought was "Where did that arc come from?"

The lead fell the rest of the way without an arc, and the TC was operating solo again. However I did feel a pin prick where the arc left my hand. I felt NO electric shock whatsoever, just the pin prick. At closer examination of my hand I noticed a black dot the size as this full-stop (.). It was the burn mark where the heat from the arc's centre burnt the cells from the skin surface of my hand.

My second revelation was that the extra 6 inches of arc did not come from the TC, but from my body. That is about 150,000 volts discharged from the body. This is far more than some static build up on clothing etc. This points to body energies, which did not effect me (other than the dot burn). I did not notice any weakening in strength from this. Besides the whole experience was somewhat exhilarating.
 
Joined
Apr 26, 2015
Messages
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#47
A few years later I built a few more Tesla Coils. The main coil was based on the Oudin Coil principle but in a conical shape.

I remember it being a particular difficult design to wind. I had nylon fishing line in between each turn to give extra insulation. Every turn added 5,000 volts, and the enamel coating on the wire was not meant to insulate that much voltage. The trouble was that the wire was heavier and stiffer than the fishing line, so after winding a few turns the copper wire would creep down and force the fishing line out. As a result I had to glue each turn in place, and wait for it to set. Then do the next turn. As you can imagine, it took a long time to wind the coil, but it was worth it.


The output arc from the aluminium dome was pink in colour, it moved around gracefully. It was a very different arc indeed. I think the electromagnetic field around the coil had a lot to do with its characteristics.

The coil alone was about 500 mm (20 inches) long.
 
Joined
Apr 26, 2015
Messages
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Christian
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#50
At the time of building the Oudin Coil, I was wondering how to conduct an experiment in relationship to a flame. I remember seeing a photograph of an electric arc which appeared as a flame. Tesla mentions this also. Unfortunately, I was not able to reproduce a flame. However, the flame is a curious thing, because at the time of my experiments (1995) nobody then could explain what exactly it is. Now they know it is the release of energy from the decomposing material by combustion.



As shown above, the arc comes from a copper wire, sitting on the dome terminal, pointing at the flame. The arc enters at the base of the flame and re-emerges from the top of the flame. In between, there is no indication of an arc. This provided the idea that the flame was not only conductive, but also electrostatic by nature.

My revelation at this time was that the breakdown of molecular bonds releases its bonding energy in the form of electrostatic electricity under heat.

Strangely enough that the hottest part of the flame is not its centre, or at the point were molecular bonds of wax is releasing its energy. I believe the flame has much more to tell us than what we already know about it.