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If a T Rex or something similar was discovered in the wild today

Joined
Feb 15, 2012
Messages
6
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#1
Do you really think atheists would be affected by this? I've been trying to buff up on science and the bible more than just verses to try and convert people which this seems like is the best way.


What are your favorite bible videos on science? :)
 
Joined
Jul 29, 2012
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#2
Do you really think atheists would be affected by this? I've been trying to buff up on science and the bible more than just verses to try and convert people which this seems like is the best way.
This has already happened.

The coelacanth, the "dino-fish", was thought to be extinct for 65 million years.

A living specimen was found off the east coast of South Africa, off the Chalumna River (now Tyolomnqa) in 1938.

It hasn't evolved one centimeter in 65 million years.

What are your favorite bible videos on science? :)
The Bible doesn't contain any videos.
 
Joined
Jun 22, 2012
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#3
Mint

Can you provide links to articles/sources re: this dino fish?
 
Joined
Jul 29, 2012
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#4
Hello.

Sure, but I put "dino fish" in quotes because it was used by somebody else.

I'm not sure it's intended to be accurate nomenclature.

DINOFISH.com - COELACANTH: THE FISH OUT OF TIME

http://www.dinofish.com/

Of course there is Google and Wikipedia.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coelacanth
Discovery

The coelacanths, which are related to lungfishes and tetrapods, were believed to have been extinct since the end of the Cretaceous period. More closely related to tetrapods than even the ray-finned fish, coelacanths were considered the "missing link" between the fish and the tetrapods until the first Latimeria specimen was found off the east coast of South Africa, off the Chalumna River (now Tyolomnqa) in 1938.[6] Museum curator Marjorie Courtenay-Latimer discovered the fish among the catch of a local angler, Captain Hendrick Goosen, on December 23, 1938.[6] A local chemistry professor, JLB Smith, confirmed the fish's importance with a famous cable: "MOST IMPORTANT PRESERVE SKELETON AND GILLS = FISH DESCRIBED".[6]
The discovery of a species still living, when they were believed to have gone extinct 65 million years previously, makes the coelacanth the best-known example of a Lazarus taxon, a species that seems to have disappeared from the fossil record only to reappear much later. Since 1938, Latimeria chalumnae have been found in the Comoros, Kenya, Tanzania, Mozambique, Madagascar, and in iSimangaliso Wetland Park, Kwazulu-Natal in South Africa.
The second extant species, L. menadoensis, was described from Manado, North Sulawesi, Indonesia in 1999 by Pouyaud et al.[7] based on a specimen discovered by Erdmann in 1998[8] and deposited at the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI). Only a photograph of the first specimen of this species was made at a local market by Arnaz and Mark Erdmann before it was bought by a shopper.
The coelacanth has no real commercial value, apart from being coveted by museums and private collectors. As a food fish the coelacanth is almost worthless, as its tissues exude oils that give the flesh a foul flavour.[9] The continued survivability of the coelacanth may be threatened by commercial deep-sea trawling.[10]
Admittedly, evolution is not a field that I study.
 
Joined
Oct 1, 2013
Messages
181
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#6
Were these animals before the flood and died out in the flood, except that fish of course.