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Intel, AMD, and Arm Chips Have Been Hacked

Joined
Apr 13, 2014
Messages
2,846
Christian
Yes
#1
Hackers have found a way to hack chips from Intel, AMD, and Arm. Doesn't matter whether you use Windows, Linux, Apple, or Chromebook. Hackers are targeting the chips, not the software.

Software patches can help keep hackers out of the chips, but software writers are playing catch up with the hackers. Chips made in the recent 5 years are being patched first, and older chips will receive patches in the future. Myriad hackers are working night and day to exploit the chips before software writers can figure out how to protect them. Its important to regularly update your software and firmware to protect your computers. Also, stay away from questionable web sites, and don't click on unknown email.

A complete fix will require Intel to design new chips, and computer buyers to buy new computers.

For those using Windows, Microsoft is not able to patch their computers if they are using some third party security software. Some patches require updating firmware on the chips themselves, potentially making it complicated for computer novices:

ZDNet said:
While the operating system updates address Meltdown, Spectre fixes rely on firmware updates from hardware vendors that implement microcode fixes from chip vendors. In Intel's case, its microcode update introduces its Indirect Branch Prediction Side Channel Analysis Method.
Microsoft is recommending:

Microsoft said:
Apply the applicable firmware update that is provided by the device manufacturer.
Intel has released a detection tool to determine if your Intel processor is affected.
 
Last edited:

Truthfrees

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#2
Hackers have found a way to hack chips from Intel, AMD, and Arm. Doesn't matter whether you use Windows, Linux, Apple, or Chromebook. Hackers are targeting the chips, not the software.

Software patches can help keep hackers out of the chips, but software writers are playing catch up with the hackers. Chips made in the recent 5 years are being patched first, and older chips will receive patches in the future. Myriad hackers are working night and day to exploit the chips before software writers can figure out how to protect them. Its important to regularly update your software and firmware to protect your computers. Also, stay away from questionable web sites, and don't click on unknown email.

A complete fix will require Intel to design new chips, and computer buyers to buy new computers.

For those using Windows, Microsoft is not able to patch their computers if they are using some third party security software. Some patches require updating firmware on the chips themselves, potentially making it complicated for computer novices:



Microsoft is recommending:



Intel has released a detection tool to determine if your Intel processor is affected.
crazy
 
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Aug 4, 2005
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#3
It does seem to be an exploit, but from what I understand you almost have to be singled out. This is not drive-by malware that anybody can pick up and any hacker can use. So, what happened crudely speaking is the burglar overheard the neighbors talking where the hidden key was, and all houses have them so now we have to change to some other idea than a hidden key. That can happen to anyone anywhere, but only one was overheard. There is some concern that that talkative neighbor is in fact an app that a hacker can use to get into those chips, but then that only calls for more diligence on the part of programmers. My first impression is that we need some sort of software (even if only rudimentary software) to also do this. Now how is that going to be loaded on a machine unless someone allows it? (with maybe the exception of Microsoft in which they predicted will have the greatest problems with this proportionally speaking). I think besides the OS updates, program writers are already on it despite the fact there wasn't a case in the wild. These are pro hackers looking for stuff. Of course if they keep mouthing off it may given someone nefarious ideas. I know Linux has already patched this (the best it could be) and Google did. There were exploits in this Chromebook via the chrome browser that supposedly is already patched. Plus Google Chromebooks don't get viruses and indeed can't download anything nefarious either with or without the owner's knowledge. The only variable is their browser and like I said, was dealt with already. That's probably what my Linux and Google updates were about just the other day. In short, unless one owns Microsoft, I would not sweat this, but with MS, people were already walking on eggshells the last 30 years anyway. :lol Seriously, even most Microsofts won't be victim of THIS exploit I predict, just higher percentage if they do than the other machines.
 
Joined
Apr 13, 2014
Messages
2,846
Christian
Yes
#4
ZDNet said:
All these patches address the Meltdown problem. Spectre is a different story. There are no Spectre patches available yet.
Linux volunteers are working on patches. They are playing catch up, because they were not kept in the loop like Microsoft and Apple were. There are no patches for older Linux products, so upgrade to the latest version.

Meltdown will be patched soon. Spectre can only be mitigated. A complete fix will require a redesign of chips, and customers to buy new computers.
 

Truthfrees

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#6
Linux volunteers are working on patches. They are playing catch up, because they were not kept in the loop like Microsoft and Apple were. There are no patches for older Linux products, so upgrade to the latest version.

Meltdown will be patched soon. Spectre can only be mitigated. A complete fix will require a redesign of chips, and customers to buy new computers.
Gibson Research has released a simple tool to let you know if your computer is protected.
thanks for this