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Bible Study Definition

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Featherbop

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Joined
Jun 10, 2003
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"Transgression of the law, an offense against God."

I thought I did this for you already. :-?
 
A

Asimov

Guest
Yes, DM, but you are an individual.

I just want to see how other define sin.
 
A

Asimov

Guest
Anyone who wants to give me their definition. In order to formulate what sin is, one must listen to more than a single definition.
 
G

Gary

Guest
I thought you had done Bible study? If you had, it would have been very simple. In the Bible, you have several definitions of sin. And they are from different authors.

As this is a Christian forum and we believe the Bible and sin is a Christian concept, the Bible will be the right place to look.

Have you looked there?

:-?
 
G

Gary

Guest
Darck Marck was right.

One concept of sin in the Old Testament is that of transgression of the law. God established the law as a standard of righteousness; any violation of this standard is defined as sin. Deuteronomy 6:24-25 is a statement of this principle from the perspective that a person who keeps the law is righteous. The implication is that the person who does not keep the law is not righteous, that is, sinful.

Another concept of sin in the Old Testament is as breach of the covenant. God made a covenant with the nation Israel; they were bound by this covenant as a people (Ex. 19; 24; Josh. 24). Each year on the Day of Atonement, the nation went through a covenant renewal. When the high priest consecrated the people by sprinkling them with the blood of the atoning sacrifice, they renewed their vows to the Lord to be a covenant-keeping people. Any breach of this covenant was viewed as sin (Deut. 29:19-21.)

The Old Testament also pictures sin as a violation of the righteous nature of God. As the righteous and holy God, He sets forth as a criterion for His people a righteousness like His own. (Lev. 11:45.) Any deviation from God’s own righteousness is viewed as sin.

The Old Testament has a rich vocabulary for sin.

Chata means “to miss the mark,†as does the Greek hamartia. The word could be used to describe a person shooting a bow and arrow and missing the target with the arrow. When it is used to describe sin, it means that the person has missed the mark that God has established for the person’s life.

Aven describes the crooked or perverse spirit associated with sin. Sinful persons have perverted their spirits and become crooked rather than straight.

Ra describes the violence associated with sin. It also has the connotation of the breaking out of evil.

Sin is the opposite of righteousness or moral straightness in the Old Testament.

OK? Want more? I am sure you would have read these IF you had studied the Bible.

:) :)
 
G

Gary

Guest
..... more..... (still under the heading of "Bible Study")

The New Testament picture is much like that of the Old Testament.

Several of the words used for sin in the New Testament have almost the same meaning as some of the Hebrew words used in the Old Testament. The most notable advancement in the New Testament view of sin is the fact that sin is defined against the backdrop of Jesus as the standard for righteousness. His life exemplifies perfection. The exalted purity of His life creates the norm for judging what is sinful.

In the New Testament, sin also is viewed as a lack of fellowship with God. The ideal life is one of fellowship with God. Anything which disturbs or distorts this fellowship is sin.

The New Testament view of sin is somewhat more subjective than objective. Jesus taught quite forcefully that sin is a condition of the heart. He traced sin directly to inner motives stating that the sinful thought leading to the overt act is the real sin. The outward deed is actually the fruit of sin. Anger in the heart is the same as murder (Matt. 5:21-22). The impure look is tantamount to adultery (Matt. 5:27-28). The real defilement in a person stems from the inner person (heart) which is sinful (Matt. 15:18-20). Sin, therefore, is understood as involving the essential being of a person, that is, the essential essence of human nature.

The New Testament interprets sin as unbelief. However, unbelief is not just the rejection of a dogma or a creed. Rather, it is the rejection of that spiritual light which has been revealed in Jesus Christ. Or, from another perspective, unbelief is the rejection of the supreme revelation as it is found in the person of Jesus Christ. Unbelief is resistance to the truth of God revealed by the Spirit of God and produces moral and spiritual blindness. The outcome of such rejection is judgment. The only criterion for judgment is whether or not one has accepted or rejected the revelation of God as found in Jesus Christ (John 3:18-19; 16:8-16).

The New Testament further pictures sin as being revealed by the law of Moses. The law was preparatory, and its function was to point to Christ. The law revealed sin in its true character, but this only aroused in humanity a desire to experience the forbidden fruit of sin. The law as such is not bad, but humanity simply does not have the ability to keep the law. Therefore, the law offers no means of salvation; rather, it leaves humanity with a deep sense of sin and guilt (Rom. 7). The law, therefore, serves to bring sin into bold relief, so that it is clearly perceptible.

The most common New Testament word for sin is hamartia. That has already been explained in the post above.

Parabasis, “trespass†or “transgression,†literally, means to step across the line. One who steps over a property line has trespassed on another person’s land; the person who steps across God’s standard of righteousness has committed a trespass or transgression.

Anomia means “lawlessness†or “iniquity†and is a rather general description of sinful acts, referring to almost any action in opposition to God’s standard of righteousness.

Poneria, “evil†or “wickedness,†is even a more general term than anomia.

Adikia, “unrighteousness,†is just the opposite of righteous. In forensic contexts outside the New Testament, it described one who was on the wrong side of the law.

Akatharsia, “uncleanness†or “impurity,†was a cultic word used to describe anything which could cause cultic impurity. It was used quite often to describe vicious acts or sexual sins.

Apistia, “unbelief,†literally refers to a lack of faith. To refuse to accept the truth of God by faith is to sin. Hence any action which can be construed as unfaithful or any disposition which is marked by a lack of faith is sinful.

Epithumia, often translated “lust,†is actually a neutral word. Only the context can determine if the desire is good or evil. Jesus said, “I have eagerly desired to eat this Passover with you before I suffer†(Luke 22:15 NIV), Paul used this word with a modifier meaning, “evil,†in Colossians 3:5, where it is translated “evil concupiscence†or “evil desires.†When used in this way, the word could refer to almost any evil desire but was most often used to describe sexual sins (Matt. 5:28).

OK?

In future, I do suggest that you get yourself a Biblical dictionary.... Holman's is a great one.

:) :)

Source: HOLMAN BIBLE DICTIONARY
With summary definitions and explanatory articles on every Bible subject; introductions and teaching outlines for each Bible book; in-depth theological articles; plus internal maps, charts, illustrations, scale reconstruction drawings, and archaeological photos.
GENERAL EDITOR Trent C. Butler, Ph.D
 
A

Asimov

Guest
Gary_Bee said:
I thought you had done Bible study? If you had, it would have been very simple. In the Bible, you have several definitions of sin. And they are from different authors.

As this is a Christian forum and we believe the Bible and sin is a Christian concept, the Bible will be the right place to look.

Have you looked there?

:-?
I have, but the bible is subject to interpretation.
 
A

Asimov

Guest
Gary_Bee said:
..... more..... (still under the heading of "Bible Study")

The New Testament picture is much like that of the Old Testament.

Several of the words used for sin in the New Testament have almost the same meaning as some of the Hebrew words used in the Old Testament. The most notable advancement in the New Testament view of sin is the fact that sin is defined against the backdrop of Jesus as the standard for righteousness. His life exemplifies perfection. The exalted purity of His life creates the norm for judging what is sinful.

In the New Testament, sin also is viewed as a lack of fellowship with God. The ideal life is one of fellowship with God. Anything which disturbs or distorts this fellowship is sin.

The New Testament view of sin is somewhat more subjective than objective. Jesus taught quite forcefully that sin is a condition of the heart. He traced sin directly to inner motives stating that the sinful thought leading to the overt act is the real sin. The outward deed is actually the fruit of sin. Anger in the heart is the same as murder (Matt. 5:21-22). The impure look is tantamount to adultery (Matt. 5:27-28). The real defilement in a person stems from the inner person (heart) which is sinful (Matt. 15:18-20). Sin, therefore, is understood as involving the essential being of a person, that is, the essential essence of human nature.

The New Testament interprets sin as unbelief. However, unbelief is not just the rejection of a dogma or a creed. Rather, it is the rejection of that spiritual light which has been revealed in Jesus Christ. Or, from another perspective, unbelief is the rejection of the supreme revelation as it is found in the person of Jesus Christ. Unbelief is resistance to the truth of God revealed by the Spirit of God and produces moral and spiritual blindness. The outcome of such rejection is judgment. The only criterion for judgment is whether or not one has accepted or rejected the revelation of God as found in Jesus Christ (John 3:18-19; 16:8-16).

The New Testament further pictures sin as being revealed by the law of Moses. The law was preparatory, and its function was to point to Christ. The law revealed sin in its true character, but this only aroused in humanity a desire to experience the forbidden fruit of sin. The law as such is not bad, but humanity simply does not have the ability to keep the law. Therefore, the law offers no means of salvation; rather, it leaves humanity with a deep sense of sin and guilt (Rom. 7). The law, therefore, serves to bring sin into bold relief, so that it is clearly perceptible.

The most common New Testament word for sin is hamartia. That has already been explained in the post above.

Parabasis, “trespass†or “transgression,†literally, means to step across the line. One who steps over a property line has trespassed on another person’s land; the person who steps across God’s standard of righteousness has committed a trespass or transgression.

Anomia means “lawlessness†or “iniquity†and is a rather general description of sinful acts, referring to almost any action in opposition to God’s standard of righteousness.

Poneria, “evil†or “wickedness,†is even a more general term than anomia.

Adikia, “unrighteousness,†is just the opposite of righteous. In forensic contexts outside the New Testament, it described one who was on the wrong side of the law.

Akatharsia, “uncleanness†or “impurity,†was a cultic word used to describe anything which could cause cultic impurity. It was used quite often to describe vicious acts or sexual sins.

Apistia, “unbelief,†literally refers to a lack of faith. To refuse to accept the truth of God by faith is to sin. Hence any action which can be construed as unfaithful or any disposition which is marked by a lack of faith is sinful.

Epithumia, often translated “lust,†is actually a neutral word. Only the context can determine if the desire is good or evil. Jesus said, “I have eagerly desired to eat this Passover with you before I suffer†(Luke 22:15 NIV), Paul used this word with a modifier meaning, “evil,†in Colossians 3:5, where it is translated “evil concupiscence†or “evil desires.†When used in this way, the word could refer to almost any evil desire but was most often used to describe sexual sins (Matt. 5:28).

OK?

In future, I do suggest that you get yourself a Biblical dictionary.... Holman's is a great one.

:) :)

Source: HOLMAN BIBLE DICTIONARY
With summary definitions and explanatory articles on every Bible subject; introductions and teaching outlines for each Bible book; in-depth theological articles; plus internal maps, charts, illustrations, scale reconstruction drawings, and archaeological photos.
GENERAL EDITOR Trent C. Butler, Ph.D

Thanks Gary, it seems that you can actually give information, rather than criticism.

I prefer asking questions on here rather than looking it up in a book. I look it up in a book to verify the information, or for further reading.
 
G

Gary

Guest
It is a pleasure. What I gave was not interpretation but examples from the Bible.

It seems criticism dogs all of your posts and interactions with people. Is "ad hom" your favourite expression? You use it a lot.

I would suggest that a dictionary is always a good place to start when looking for a definition of a word. As sin is a Biblical concept, a Bible Dictionary would be the best.

You can even get it free online. Most people who have done any sort of Bible Study know that.

Here are the links:
http://bible.crosswalk.com/Dictionaries ... ictionary/
http://www.biblelearn.com/

 
E

Elijah message

Guest
The Tuatha'an said:
Yes, DM, but you are an individual.

I just want to see how other define sin.
**********
Hay, we 'ain't' nobody! (none of us) It was THE WORD OF GOD THAT was quoted!

There is NO SIN that does not violate the Eternal Law of the Universe! Unfallen world's' in the plural, un/fallen angels, FALLEN angels! [THERE WAS THAT ETERNAL DEFINIATION OF SIN IN THE COVENANT OF THE GODHEAD]! Heb. 13:20. That is how one knows what sin is!

James 2:8-12 gives the Covenant as a ten link chain so to speak, where that if one link is broken ALL LINKS are useless! In southern talk, it would be said that one could not 'tot' anything with that chain! Us'ins for sure, for James say that this chain, if broken will be [OUR STANDARD OF JUDGEMENT]!

Why not just tell us what you are looking for? :fadein:

---Elijah
 
E

Elijah message

Guest
Gary_Bee said:
Darck Marck was right.

*****
Elijah here:
Just one correction here in case that it was not pointed out in later posts? The below verse is not in the old testament only! See 1 John 3:4 "Whosoever committeth sin trangresseth also the law: for sin IS THE TRANGRESSION OF THE LAW." (and this is not Moses law or laws, of Deut. 31)
*****

One concept of sin in the Old Testament is that of transgression of the law. God established the law as a standard of righteousness; any violation of this standard is defined as sin. Deuteronomy 6:24-25 is a statement of this principle from the perspective that a person who keeps the law is righteous. The implication is that the person who does not keep the law is not righteous, that is, sinful. ....
 
B

Bob10

Guest
sin is the transgression of the law. --- 1 Jn 3:4


The Tuatha'an:
so how does this apply to the new testament?
1 Cor. 15: 34 - "....sin NOT " -- Paul

Jn 5:14 - "sin no more" -- Jesus

Romans 6:15 - "shall we sin.........God forbid" -- Paul

1 John 2:1 - "sin not" -- John the Apostle

Exodus 20:20 - "sin NOT " -- Moses

Psalms 4:4 - "sin NOT " -- David
 
E

Elijah message

Guest
The Tuatha'an said:
Ok, so how does this apply to the new testament?
Friend, it IS IN THE N.T.! (1 John 3:4) LOOK AT Isa, 42:21 & Ex, 20.
 
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