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Healthy Food

HeIsRisen2018

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I already realize that this is probably going to sound like a really stupid question but what exactly is considered healthy food? I believed that chicken nuggets and hot dogs (compared to fast food) were healthy until watching this video so I don't even know myself anymore. :shrug




 

JohnDB

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Processed foods are not healthy. Too much fat and sodium incorporated into them.

Unfortunately people rely on these processed foods for meals they "cook" at home.

Which is one reason for this forum. For people to rediscover the wonderful flavor of home made food straight from the hearth.

If done well, home cooked foods have better flavors and textures than any of the finest restaurants will make...and cost a fraction of the money.

A roasted chicken with pan gravy has half the fat and sodium as a plate of chicken nuggets.
Then the trimmings that go with the dinner... and you actually have a nutritionally balanced meal that is healthy, filling, and better tasting.
 

HeIsRisen2018

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Processed foods are not healthy. Too much fat and sodium incorporated into them.

Unfortunately people rely on these processed foods for meals they "cook" at home.

Which is one reason for this forum. For people to rediscover the wonderful flavor of home made food straight from the hearth.

If done well, home cooked foods have better flavors and textures than any of the finest restaurants will make...and cost a fraction of the money.

A roasted chicken with pan gravy has half the fat and sodium as a plate of chicken nuggets.
Then the trimmings that go with the dinner... and you actually have a nutritionally balanced meal that is healthy, filling, and better tasting.


The only thing I disagree with is that most restaurants have a better flavor than home cooked meals, they're just not always good for you.
 

WIP

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The only thing I disagree with is that most restaurants have a better flavor than home cooked meals, they're just not always good for you.
That depends. If the restaurants make their meals from scratch then the food may be pretty good in both flavor and quality but if they purchase many of the items from restaurant supply chain then who knows? Many fast food items are deep fried, such as breaded chicken or fish etc., which is not the best due to the oils used.

When I think of processed foods, I think of things like gravy and sauce packets, boxed mac & cheese, quick meals in a box like Lean Cuisine, or just about anything that we use out of a box or pouch rather than creating from scratch. Most of these items have more salt, flavor enhancers, or preservatives than we would normally put in when making from scratch in our kitchens.
 

JohnDB

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Any of the "heat and eat" foods are heavily processed.

I make scratch cookies...and they are full of sugar and butter.
BUT
For those who have diabetes they don't raise people's blood sugar the way any store bought cookies will.

A lot of your baked goods when made from scratch don't have near the effect upon diabetes that processed foods do.

Ravioli made from scratch is a treat...but the frozen or canned ravioli are almost poison with the effect upon people.

Even fried chicken...bought at your local chicken house like KFC or Bojangles will make you gain weight.... home made fried chicken has at least ⅓ fewer calories and fat.

The difference is in the fats, flours and salts.

Case in point is the Danish I made a couple weeks ago. My wife is diabetic. Normally she wouldn't even think of eating a Danish. Her blood sugar would go sky high even with extra insulin. She had 2 of mine and didn't even need a drop of extra insulin for eating the treats.

Modified food starches, modified flours, genetically modified flours, are just the start.

Then there are the modified sugars and sweeteners.
Then the modified, hydrogenated fats and oils. Then come the gums and thickening agents.

Then.... because there are no natural flavors they have to add them...


I met a chef instructor at culinary school that worked for McDonald's in the early '70's. He was hired to create chicken nuggets for them.
He tried various chicken meat and spice formulas all to have them fail for production.
His final success was to not use meat at all but instead to use nothing but the skin off the chicken that was breaded and fried.

So...yeah. fast food is not really food.
 

HeIsRisen2018

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That depends. If the restaurants make their meals from scratch then the food may be pretty good in both flavor and quality but if they purchase many of the items from restaurant supply chain then who knows? Many fast food items are deep fried, such as breaded chicken or fish etc., which is not the best due to the oils used.

When I think of processed foods, I think of things like gravy and sauce packets, boxed mac & cheese, quick meals in a box like Lean Cuisine, or just about anything that we use out of a box or pouch rather than creating from scratch. Most of these items have more salt, flavor enhancers, or preservatives than we would normally put in when making from scratch in our kitchens.

I didn't say that restaurant food was never good for you, I just meant that it wasn't always good for you. There's a difference there.


Any of the "heat and eat" foods are heavily processed.

I make scratch cookies...and they are full of sugar and butter.
BUT
For those who have diabetes they don't raise people's blood sugar the way any store bought cookies will.

A lot of your baked goods when made from scratch don't have near the effect upon diabetes that processed foods do.

Ravioli made from scratch is a treat...but the frozen or canned ravioli are almost poison with the effect upon people.

Even fried chicken...bought at your local chicken house like KFC or Bojangles will make you gain weight.... home made fried chicken has at least ⅓ fewer calories and fat.

The difference is in the fats, flours and salts.

Case in point is the Danish I made a couple weeks ago. My wife is diabetic. Normally she wouldn't even think of eating a Danish. Her blood sugar would go sky high even with extra insulin. She had 2 of mine and didn't even need a drop of extra insulin for eating the treats.

Modified food starches, modified flours, genetically modified flours, are just the start.

Then there are the modified sugars and sweeteners.
Then the modified, hydrogenated fats and oils. Then come the gums and thickening agents.

Then.... because there are no natural flavors they have to add them...


I met a chef instructor at culinary school that worked for McDonald's in the early '70's. He was hired to create chicken nuggets for them.
He tried various chicken meat and spice formulas all to have them fail for production.
His final success was to not use meat at all but instead to use nothing but the skin off the chicken that was breaded and fried.

So...yeah. fast food is not really food.



I eat the canned Ravioli all the time and even though I know there is a difference in flavor for cooked Ravioli, I honestly didn't know that there was a difference health wise. Sorry to hear that your wife is a diabetic though. :sad
 

Sparrowhawke

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One of my sons has a degree as a "Process Technician".

"Nice title," said I, "but what does it mean?" Basically he had been trained to focus on processing such as how we turned oil into petroleum by products or how we might operate a sewage or water treatment plant and etc. Almost everything involves a 'process' of one sort or another.

Food processing can be tricky. The sly advertisers oftentimes try to convince us they are making the healthy choices for us. Terms like 'fat free' or 'all natural' are often slapped on a food item that may not be healthy at all.

Another problem that I notice in particular (due to my personal health situation) is that there are no agreed upon standards. Once my doctor asked, "Would it help you if I were to send you to a Nutritionist?" Diabetics are often prescribed "Low-Carb" diets. CAD patients (Coronary Artery Disease) get 'Heart-healthy' diets. Do you have kidney problems? Okay then --> Potassium rich foods such as .... I could go on and on, but there is always more to learn.

This confusion stems from the Tower of Babel. That's not going to help Kellogg's (or us) today but it is the result of a careful analysis. We're messed up because mankind rebelled against God. /duh! Go figure.



!Sparrow
PS - Kellogg's agreed they would stop calling their sugary cereals "healthy".
 

Michael74

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Consumer Reports said:
It’s especially important for people who are more likely to be seriously affected by food poisoning: the elderly, young children, pregnant women, and those with compromised immune systems. “These people may want to consider not eating raw leafy greens at all,” Rogers says.
Anything that hasn't been cooked in some way can be dangerous to the elderly and very young. Just eating a sandwich with uncooked lettuce on top of it can be dangerous in this day and age.

Best to pray for lots and lots of HCL in your stomach if you eat uncooked leafy greens in the modern age. You will need it to zap any germs on it. Pray for a healthy digestive and immune system. Pay attention if you are prompted to skip a certain batch of lettuce.
 
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Michael74

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Michael74 You cook your lettuce ?!?
Producers don't always do a good job of keeping contamination away from it, and lettuce has negligible nutrition in it. Its mostly just decoration on a sandwich that doesn't add significant nutrients to the meal. Why put it on sandwiches in the first place if its not actually doing much of anything to feed people?

Don't feed uncooked lettuce to young children, whose immune systems are not yet fully developed.
 

JohnDB

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Spinach is a lettuce...eaten raw or cooked.
Same goes for Belgium Endive and many other varieties of lettuces.

It's usually a matter of what is currently popular whether we eat these things raw or cooked.

Eating a variety of foods is healthy...but no one can grow it all, harvest it all, or preserve it all.
I can go to the store and find fresh strawberries for a reasonable price today.
40 years ago I'd be very lucky to even find them to eat fresh... frozen? Probably...but never fresh.
 

HeIsRisen2018

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Spinach is a lettuce...eaten raw or cooked.
Same goes for Belgium Endive and many other varieties of lettuces.

It's usually a matter of what is currently popular whether we eat these things raw or cooked.

Eating a variety of foods is healthy...but no one can grow it all, harvest it all, or preserve it all.
I can go to the store and find fresh strawberries for a reasonable price today.
40 years ago I'd be very lucky to even find them to eat fresh... frozen? Probably...but never fresh.


I believe that most fruit is probably its freshest in the summertime. Or at least it is around here because that's when the prices start to sky rocket.
 

Sparrowhawke

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I can go to the store and find fresh strawberries for a reasonable price today.

What state do you live in? I can hop on my motorcycle and appear almost magically, maybe not today, but probably before those strawberries ripen overly much.
 

Luminous_Rose

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This is a can of worms question. Each person has a different definition of healthy food. Mine is pretty picky and I can't always afford to eat the way I would like lol.
 

JohnDB

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This is a can of worms question. Each person has a different definition of healthy food. Mine is pretty picky and I can't always afford to eat the way I would like lol.
Well you aren't wrong...but not exactly right either.
Diet blends are a different subject than "healthy food".

My diet, in order to be healthy for me, is nothing like my wife's diet.
I'm high carb, low fat, low protein.
My wife is high fat, high protein, and low carb.

I know others are high protein, low fat, and low carb.

It's all dependant upon genetics.
Some people can't even look at a dairy products without going into dietary distress...others have gluten issues.
Others can't do eggs.

Everyone is unique in dietary restriction requirements and balance.

But that doesn't mean that there is a diet that ever requires highly processed foods and refined sugars.
Hasn't happened yet.
 
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im...flexible, lol. i've taken to eating olives. they're...what...a fruit, vegetable? anyway, they're delicious, and as snacks go...yes, please! canned, i've got a couple of jars of the kalamatra (hope I got that correct) ones...good times.

i never was one for salads. stir fries (fresh or frozen vegetables to start with), yes, please. all the time. now, i -do- use pre-prepared, store bought seasoning over it...stir fry sauces, usually. probably not so healthful :-( .

legumes (beans, I think peanuts are in the category, too, technically) can be healthful. I buy canned, organic beans, usually black beans, and use pre-prepared fajita seasoning packets in it, have it with brown rice...and sour cream. oops. at least i get organic, right? right. peanut butter can be surprisingly healthful, too, but now I think there's concern about pesticide levels being outrageous, so...nut butters are probably best done organic, if at all possible. i don't, though...i like the taste and texture of one major brand's honey peanut butter spread, so...yeah. yeah.

fruits! Aldi, of all places, has good prices on organic produce. I missed out on a sale on my favorite variety of apples, in 3 lbs bags, organic, at a crazy insane good price. ugh. oh well...

it doesn't have to be organic, either. eating organic is mostly just a way to -reduce- one's intake of the sometimes toxic stuff that goes into making our food. I think the data on nutrient value in organic produce shows something of an advantage for organic produce, -but- ...

(get ready for a repeat...) I"m into supplements. many 'alternative' health experts are quick to point out that even the best diets with organic foods...

won't necessarily provide what they consider optimal levels of vital nutrients. many supplements are cheap, especially c and b-complex, a multi-vitamin you like and can afford (I'm thinking of going for a gummy, myself), and...yeah. yeah.
 

WIP

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I make scratch cookies...and they are full of sugar and butter.
Just an observation. Do you use bleached or unbleached white flour? If so, then you are using processed food. Also note, that bleached flour is chemically treated to bleach it whereas unbleached is done through a slower natural process.

White flour is devoid of most nutritional value because only the inner white part or starchy endosperm of the wheat seed is used. The germ, which contains most of the nutritional value, and bran, which contains most of the fiber, are removed.

White flour typically produces a smoother and less crumbly end product when used in baking and since most of us have grown up on white flour it may take a little getting used to the different taste and texture.

When I was diagnosed with type II diabetes I began to switch to whole wheat bread because the higher fiber is beneficial to managing blood glucose levels. Now, I prefer it to white bread.
 

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