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He's Right Though

HeIsRisen2018

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Science is useful in skilled trades. Hydraulics, pneumatic equipment, electricity, etc... all require a basic understanding of science. Supervisors at industrial plants need to understand the basic processes of how things are made at their plant.

If all someone wants to do is sweep the floor, they don't need to understand science. If they want a job where they make a bit of money, they should pay attention in their science classes. The more you know, the better your chances of getting a promotion.



Ah I see, makes sense.
 

WIP

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Carpenters don't need an exorbitant amount of math...fractions and angles is about as far as they go.

Tin Knockers (HVAC) guys don't use a ton of math either. Square feet/cubic feet usually is as complicated as they get.

Plumbing/pipefitting.... same thing. Pressure and rise is all they use too... even the ones welding.

I'm not sure about guys hanging drywall...they don't speak a lot of English.

Painters are usually too drunk to do much figuring.
I think you're underestimating the mathematical needs for these trades. Sounds to me more like you're describing the needs for a job grunt and not the specialized trade.

Most trades can and do apply skills using various levels of algebra, geometry, trigonometry, calculus, statistical mathematics, engineering science, physics, dimensional analysis, blueprint reading, material and labor estimating, accounting, and so forth.
 

Edward

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I basically forgot pretty much everything I learned in high school because I don't need it. All I needed was basic English and math skills. Some of school was fun don't get me wrong, but it shouldn't be mandatory past elementary school. If you want to go to college it's probably a good idea but you don't need to know very much on simple jobs so why a high school diploma is required a lot of the time is beyond me. :shrug
All a high school diploma really shows is that the individual can hang in there and complete a task set before them. So their job prospects will be better than those who were quitters.

I used to regret not going to college but now I don't anymore because I know that they would have molded me and conformed me to this world and I'd prolly be an educated high paid punk by now, who had no heart and didn't care about anyone except myself.

Romans 12:2
2 And be not conformed to this world: but be ye transformed by the renewing of your mind, that ye may prove what is that good, and acceptable, and perfect, will of God.../
 

JohnDB

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I think you're underestimating the mathematical needs for these trades. Sounds to me more like you're describing the needs for a job grunt and not the specialized trade.

Most trades can and do apply skills using various levels of algebra, geometry, trigonometry, calculus, statistical mathematics, engineering science, physics, dimensional analysis, blueprint reading, material and labor estimating, accounting, and so forth.
Oh I know that it's done...estimating can be done with calculus formulas. Even with "magic numbers"
Sq ft of previous job costs multiplied to SQ feet of job you are bidding on...any extras added in and then profits put on top.

My way doesn't use calculus formulas but it isn't out of the realm of possibility to be used for new construction or a complete rebuild of an office floor. Also for checking on how a foreman is really doing.
I've talked with the upper management about all these things being utilized.
They even have used them to check up on how I do...(they wanted to put me in a bottle as lotion and rub me on their others)

As grunt labor though most can do just fine financially without using anything beyond grade school mathematics.

You and I... well we are a bit different. We can and do go well beyond because we have enough wisdom to know how, when, and why we should use more advanced mathematics to go further.

The automotive glass guy I mentioned before?
He is not a bright guy. But he hired smart guys for those things when he started getting larger. His business exploded because he saw the need and with humility admitted that he didn't know enough. Hired the right guys and women to help him. Kinda a miracle really.
Everyone talks about him as being an exception to the rule. Henry Ford is discussed as being the same way.
He just recognized the importance of Peter Drucker's work. (Created assembly lines and work productivity guidelines)

They weren't new concepts...just a broad understanding of what they really accomplished.
 

Serving Zion

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The real advantage of youth is the purity - both of conscience and of desire. So a young person literally has their whole life ahead of them, an "open book", full of possibilities. With age, through experiences and choices, we become far more restricted in our opportunities to choose. We become fixed in a career, committed to life partners and children, committed financially, self-conscious and basically stuck in our ways. Exhausted and always wishing for the freedom of the former life, we have no remainder of interest except to relax and enjoy the opportunity to relax and enjoy, whenever we have a moment to choose for our selves.

So, the purpose of education is to equip a young person with a breadth of talent sufficient to support them in any area of specialisation that they might find an interest in. For this to be successful, the absorptive capacity of the human brain is managed by a curriculum designed according to expert consensus as to the normal ability for humans to learn - ensuring that they have the basic skills for higher education and also understanding that the programming of social behaviour is most successful when applied systematically and uniformly.

As the curriculum advances, leading the student into depths of knowledge that demand more of the brain's resources, the breadth of topics is reduced by giving students an opportunity to choose topics that they are particularly interested in or well suited to learning.

The brain is an organ with an inherent nature to remain optimised, so for efficiency it learns to keep in tune for the types of tasks it is often performing and with time it will forget to operate in ways that it had once been proficient.
 
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