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Majority would fail this

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Sparrowhawke

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how long it takes to "boil" those eggs!!
I see there is a failure to communicate.

You simply can't boil eggs. They break if they boil and then they solidify all messy like in the water (the water which may be boiling). I suppose there could be an experiment where we found the "boiling point" of the whites or the yoks or the scrambled (see the video for in-shell scramble technique) and if the actual boiling point for any of the three kinds of "eggs" were lower than the typical sea level boiling point of water, it would be conceivable to "boil eggs" or at lease a portion thereof. But do read again (I will too); I'm sure we are speaking about the time it may take to boil water. Also you can never raise the temperature of water above its boiling point (not really positive about that one, it's what I've heard but then I have not put that theory to a 'double boiler' test) also one simply may not compress water. It may be pumped but only air may be compressed. Grrrrr....

Or "no matter," as you like. I'm okay with both.

"TO avoid the danger of scorching or 'burning on' in cooking food over a fire,

the double boiler has been invented. This insures an equable temperature in the process of cooking, with no risk whatever that the temperature will rise above the boiling-point of water, no matter how hot the fire may be under the boiler. Into a kettle partly filled with water is fitted a smaller one with a rim near the top to support it. The inner kettle contains the substance to be cooked, and is provided with a lid. There you have the double boiler. The fire acts directly on the contents of the lower or outer boiler, heating the water, which in turn transmits its heat to the upper or inner boiler. In this manner no excess of heat can by any possibility injure the cooking food, and there is never any crust of burnt matter found clinging to the bottom of the vessel in which the food is contained, simply because no part of that food ever passes the comparatively low temperature of boiling water."

The Secret of Everyday Things by Jean Henri Fabre
Okay, but there may be another test that somebody smarter than me has thought of. Now I'm thinking about something like a water balloon made with industrial strength material that also clings to the smallest shape of the water... no, the water will boil, it will turn into a gaseous state at minimum and the boiling will happen, but then we think about reduction of the surface tension by adding some oil to the fluid. And that will make the bubbles pop faster (before they get large) but it will not stop the transfer of the water in a liquid state into that of a gaseous state. Okay, water has a high specific heat (resistance to temperature change) because of its hydrogen bonds. Before raising its temperature, the heat has to go into disrupting the hydrogen bonds so they can break, and then the molecules can move faster to become a gas. (That one was found on WikiAnswers).

Okay, found what I was looking for, seems that I didn't want "double boilers" but instead something else from my Mother's kitchen, a "pressure cooker":

Superheated water
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Pressure cookers produce superheated water, which cooks the food much more rapidly than boiling water.

Superheated water is liquid water under pressure at temperatures between the usual boiling point, 100 °C (212 °F) and the critical temperature, 374 °C (705 °F). It is also known as "subcritical water" or "pressurized hot water." Superheated water is stable because of overpressure that raises the boiling point, or by heating it in a sealed vessel with a headspace, where the liquid water is in equilibrium with vapour at the saturated vapor pressure. This is distinct from the use of the term superheating to refer to water at atmospheric pressure above its normal boiling point, which has not boiled due to a lack of nucleation sites (sometimes experienced by heating liquids in a microwave).
Okay, now we may compare the "boiling point of egg fluids" and consider if that is possible. I assume it is. But boiling eggs is an entirely different thought.
 
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**Ahem**

I see there is a failure to communicate. You simply can't boil eggs. They break if they boil and then they solidify all messy like in the water (the water which may be boiling). I suppose there could be an experiment where we found the "boiling point" of the whites or the yoks or the scrambled (see the video for in-shell scramble technique) and if the actual boiling point for any of the three kinds of "eggs" were lower than the typical sea level boiling point of water, it would be conceivable to "boil eggs" or at lease a portion thereof. But do read again (I will too); I'm sure we are speaking about the time it may take to boil water. Also you can never raise the temperature of water above its boiling point (not really positive about that one, it's what I've heard but then I have not put that theory to a 'double boiler' test) also one simply may not compress water. It may be pumped but only air may be compressed. Grrrrr....
Go growl at somebody else, bro.

Way too imprecise a question! First, you don't really "boil" an egg. You bring it to a temperature somewhere between 155 degrees (soft, uniform, firm white and liquid yoke) to 180 degrees (firm white and yoke, with the yoke somewhat congealed, somewhat crumbly). Now, which style egg do you want? Or do you want something in between? Tell me what I'm fixing and I'll tell you how long I'm going to cook them.
How quickly we forget. Or just plain don't read.

:toofunny
 

Classik

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Now I know majority of you guys don't do the cooking. The women do the cooking while the guys show expertise in the eating;)


How could someone not have published a result.

Over to women!

Ohw lliw lleb eht tac???
:crying4 :crying :bigcry


:toofunny :toofunny
 

Thirstyone

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Is this a guy thing and women are thought not capable?
Yes.

Well, I guess then according to that I would not be able to do this for you....uhh....guys. :biggrin
See what happens when you only skim the last page of a thread? :yes
Really? That's all I ever do anyway! :biggrin (It's also how I read murder mysteries -- no undue and prolonged suspense that way.) Oh wow, that's no fun. ;)

*tiptoes out of the thread*
Wait! Don't go. You still gotta show us how long it takes to "boil" those eggs!! :toofunny
How can I if its a guy thing? :biggrinunno
Getting used to these quotes.....is the reason for editing

Hopefully you guys can decipher this...I am SURE you are all capable of doing just that. :tongue
 

Thirstyone

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Sorry guys, too much to read in this thread and I can't be on long. Let me say a few things about boiling eggs and if it has already been touched on....well...then it is what it is. :biggrin

To make a good boiled egg you do not want to use fresh eggs. How long does it take? I did see someone mentioned eggs breaking in the water. Are you adding them after you start boiling the water? If done correctly with the eggs in the water before you start to boil them, you rarely have a problem with an egg breaking.

Are we doing this on a gas stove or an electric stove?

Are these eggs at room temp, or just from the refrigerator?

When I make an angel food cake, the whites are at room temp before I start beating them. So temperature is important in our experiment.

I have to leave for now, and will try to get back a little later.

I will practice on quoting. :biggrin
 

Thirstyone

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I started thinking (oh no) :) that if you want a soft boiled egg you could use fresh eggs. You wouldn't be trying to peel them as you would when hard boiled. I have boiled two dozen eggs at one time in order to make a huge batch of potato salad for a gathering. What I have noticed when cooking a large amount of eggs, even though they are sitting in the water covered the whole time, some of them come out perfect ( yellows are perfectly yellow with no green tinge which means they have been cooked too long) and some come out with the start of a green tinge, so I am going to assume it is placement in the water that is factoring in on that.
 

Classik

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I understand what you are trying to say. I think the freshness plays an important role here. I prefer hard boiled eggs...cos I don't wanna end up eating the shell. Hope you know what I mean. Slow cooking is best - with not-too-hot heat (kero stove preferably).

I know most of the guys are lost. Sorry guys. They know how to refill the car oil or replace the battery acid. Here is kitchen stuff discussed...and some are totally lost.
:toofunny
 

Thirstyone

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I understand what you are trying to say. I think the freshness plays an important role here. I prefer hard boiled eggs...cos I don't wanna end up eating the shell. Hope you know what I mean. Slow cooking is best - with not-too-hot heat (kero stove preferably).

I know most of the guys are lost. Sorry guys. They know how to refill the car oil or replace the battery acid. Here is kitchen stuff discussed...and some are totally lost.
:toofunny
Yes, freshness does play a role. Since I have fresh eggs right out the chicken I had to learn the hard way, fresh eggs don't peel very well at all. I found that waiting until they are close to two weeks old works better.

I didn't know you replace battery acid. I have always added distilled water to the battery in my car. I have even replaced the battery by myself. I can also add oil when necessary.

I have never cooked on a kero stove. Is that a kerosene stove? Please educate me on this. I need to learn how to, ya' never know that knowledge will come in handy.

It appears as if I have scared the "guys" away.

Guess it's time to tiptoe out again. I think they were having fun with it and I probably ruined all their fun.

Bye guys!!!!:biggrin
 

Thirstyone

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I got to thinking again.....I haven't messed with a battery for years. I think they enclose them now. Besides, I let my husband do all that nowadays. Frees me up to be in the kitchen. :lol

Sorry guys I came back in. Ok NOW I will .......................

tip....................

toe....................

out!!! :biggrin
 

Sparrowhawke

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They know how to refill the car oil or replace the battery acid.
:shocked! Replace the battery acid? Not me. I'd charge the battery or replace it with a new one. No way somebody is going to convince me to replace the battery acid. What are you thinking? Kids, don't try this at home! :amen

As far as "the kitchen" goes? You're right. I did pay attention when my mom taught my sisters to cook but my job was "special". I was the official taste tester. At the time I enjoyed the little bit if extra attention and when she'd let me "check the taste" of her pie crust to see if some more salt was needed or not she would (and I was pleased) follow my advice every time. But I never learned the "feel" of the crust, my fingers never touched it and all three of my sisters learned the secret of what I know now is the best pie crust in the world. Would they share with their brother who loves them, even later in life? None have.

But that doesn't mean that I'm a stranger in the kitchen, that's another story, for another day. I'm too busy feeling sad because I can't make a better than Betty Crocker crust. :rolling
 

Thirstyone

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so I am going to assume it is placement in the water that is factoring in on that.
Why?
First of all....you realize I came back into the thread to answer this, because you called me in by quoting me? :biggrin

Cooking 24 eggs in a pot totally covered in water. Most came out perfect...or what I consider perfect. No green tinge around the yellow. The green tinge around the outside of the yellow part of the yolk means it has cooked too long. I am assuming that the ones on the bottom are getting a little hotter since they are closer sitting on the glasstop electric stove which may make them cook slightly faster than the rest. Without actually checking each one as I take it out I have never known for sure.

I normally boil a dozen eggs at a time and can have the same thing occur. I usually end up with at least two layers or more of eggs sitting in the pan. I take a top one out to check and make sure it is done after the allotted time. It is usually always just right when I check. On rare occasions if it has a green tinge...then the whole lot has green tinge.............which means cooked too long.

When they are cooked too long it's usually because I wasn't paying close attention to them.
 

Classik

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I understand what you are trying to say. I think the freshness plays an important role here. I prefer hard boiled eggs...cos I don't wanna end up eating the shell. Hope you know what I mean. Slow cooking is best - with not-too-hot heat (kero stove preferably).

I know most of the guys are lost. Sorry guys. They know how to refill the car oil or replace the battery acid. Here is kitchen stuff discussed...and some are totally lost.
:toofunny
Yes, freshness does play a role. Since I have fresh eggs right out the chicken I had to learn the hard way, fresh eggs don't peel very well at all. I found that waiting until they are close to two weeks old works better.

I didn't know you replace battery acid. I have always added distilled water to the battery in my car. I have even replaced the battery by myself. I can also add oil when necessary.

I have never cooked on a kero stove. Is that a kerosene stove? Please educate me on this. I need to learn how to, ya' never know that knowledge will come in handy.

It appears as if I have scared the "guys" away.

Guess it's time to tiptoe out again. I think they were having fun with it and I probably ruined all their fun.

Bye guys!!!!:biggrin
Majority of guys don't care about the cooking...and very very very few don't care about the eating. :toofunny :biggrin :biglol

Stoves are awful...but are good when you want to control temperature to a reasonable 'taste' and or give better taste to food.

Did you know foods prepared in a fireplace (i.e using the ancient method 'drywood') taste better than the others prepared using stoves, gas cookers, mwaves Os, etc... (The magic involved is the yellow flame or fire..not the blue one).

Grandma was a worldclass cook. She managed hotels. And she taught us a lot. (the intensity of heat really plays a wonderful role on the taste of the food. Try this. It is true. I owe a lot to grandma and experience)
 

Classik

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And to prove this point, try roasting some chicken over woodfire (yellow flames). Try another over your gas cooker (blue flames).

One tastes better.

You guys should pay for this cooking tip:biggrin
 

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