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Psalms Class 1C

Jim Parker

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Psalms Class 1C

OK. I’m going to take a little sidetrack for a moment.

I thought I could do a week’s worth of Psalms a week. It turns out that I just don’t have enough time. If I try to go Psalm by Psalm through all 150 psalms, a week’s worth per week, it will take 30 weeks and I can’t even get to that pace.

SO: I’m going to select psalms that represent the different types of Psalms in the Psalter.

And, here is some background information about the various types of psalms.

There are four major categories of Psalms.

I. Psalm of praise of the individual
Psa 9:1 To the Chief Musician. To the tune of “Death of the Son.” A Psalm of David.
I will praise You, O LORD, with my whole heart;
I will tell of all Your marvelous works.


II. Psalm of praise of the people
Psa 106:1 Praise the LORD!
Oh, give thanks to the LORD, for He is good!
For His mercy endures forever.


Also; Psalms of praise are generally of two types:

(A) Declarative praise (God has acted)
Psa 22:4-5 Our fathers trusted in You; They trusted, and You delivered them.
They cried to You, and were delivered; They trusted in You, and were not ashamed.


and

(B) Descriptive praise. (God is…does…)
Psa 103:1-6 A Psalm of David.
Bless the LORD, O my soul; And all that is within me, bless His holy name!

Bless the LORD, O my soul, And forget not all His benefits:
Who forgives all your iniquities, Who heals all your diseases,
Who redeems your life from destruction,
Who crowns you with loving kindness and tender mercies,
Who satisfies your mouth with good things, So that your youth is renewed like the eagle’s.

The LORD executes righteousness And justice for all who are oppressed.


III. Psalm of Lament of the individual
Psa 13:1
To the Chief Musician. A Psalm of David.
How long, O LORD? Will You forget me forever?
How long will You hide Your face from me?


IV. Psalm of Lament of the people
Psa 74:1 A Contemplation of Asaph.
O God, why have You cast us off forever?
Why does Your anger smoke against the sheep of Your pasture?



There is a relationship between the Lament of the People and praise to God within a psalm which are seen in three motifs.

You will find that, when a Psalm is about bad times, there will be a petition to God to deliver the people, to forgive them and to restore them to their former state of peace and blessing. That petition is commonly followed by a promise to praise God, to offer sacrifices, and to keep His commands.

1. Reference to God’s saving deeds in the past.

Psa 107:19-20 Then they cried out to the LORD in their trouble,
And He saved them out of their distresses.
He sent His word and healed them, And delivered them from their destructions.

2. A confession of trust is found between the lament (what’s going wrong) and the petition (what the people ask God to do in their behalf.)

Psa 74:12 For God is my King from of old, Working salvation in the midst of the earth.

3. The vow of praise.

Psa 80:18 Then we will not turn back from You; Revive us, and we will call upon Your name.

Psa 43:4 Then I will go to the altar of God, To God my exceeding joy;
And on the harp I will praise You, O God, my God.


Psa 51:14 Deliver me from the guilt of bloodshed, O God, The God of my salvation,
And my tongue shall sing aloud of Your righteousness.



I have heard people say how they love the Psalms because of the sweet spirit in them and the ability of the Psalms to lift you up. This is true. However, many of the Psalms express the anguish of the author who is in peril, grief, or sorrow.

There is no human emotion that may not properly be brought before God, even bitterness and deep desire for revenge.

Consider Psalm 137. It is written during the exile of Judea to Babylon. The writer pours out his anguish before the Lord.

By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat down, yea, we wept when we remembered Zion.
We hung our harps upon the willows in the midst of it.
For there those who carried us away captive asked of us a song,
And those who plundered us requested mirth, saying, “Sing us one of the songs of Zion!”

How shall we sing the LORD’s song in a foreign land?
The Babylonians torment them by mockingly asking them to sing a song about the glories of Zion which those people have destroyed and plundered and defiled.

If I forget you, O Jerusalem, let my right hand forget its skill!
If I do not remember you, let my tongue cling to the roof of my mouth—
If I do not exalt Jerusalem above my chief joy.

But the Jewish exiles hold the memory of Zion dear in their hearts.

Remember, O LORD, against the sons of Edom the day of Jerusalem,
Who said, “Raze it, raze it, to its very foundation!”

They ask the Lord to deal harshly with those who watched the destruction of Jerusalem with delight.

O daughter of Babylon, who are to be destroyed,
Happy the one who repays you as you have served us!
Happy the one who takes and dashes your little ones against the rock!


They look forward to the time, that they know is coming, when the Babylonians will suffer the same anguish that they did when the armies of Nebuchadnezzar committed atrocities upon the defenseless people of Jerusalem, slaughtering women and infants alike. The exiled Jew takes some comfort in knowing that, the evil and horror that the Babylonians did to the people of Judea will be done to them. It's like saying, "You're gonna get yours! And then I'll laugh at YOU!"

OK.

So that’s a bit of background material.

Hope it was of some benefit.
 

Truthfrees

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Psalms Class 1C

OK. I’m going to take a little sidetrack for a moment.

I thought I could do a week’s worth of Psalms a week. It turns out that I just don’t have enough time. If I try to go Psalm by Psalm through all 150 psalms, a week’s worth per week, it will take 30 weeks and I can’t even get to that pace.

SO: I’m going to select psalms that represent the different types of Psalms in the Psalter.

And, here is some background information about the various types of psalms.

There are four major categories of Psalms.

I. Psalm of praise of the individual
Psa 9:1 To the Chief Musician. To the tune of “Death of the Son.” A Psalm of David.
I will praise You, O LORD, with my whole heart;
I will tell of all Your marvelous works.


II. Psalm of praise of the people
Psa 106:1 Praise the LORD!
Oh, give thanks to the LORD, for He is good!
For His mercy endures forever.


Also; Psalms of praise are generally of two types:

(A) Declarative praise (God has acted)
Psa 22:4-5 Our fathers trusted in You; They trusted, and You delivered them.
They cried to You, and were delivered; They trusted in You, and were not ashamed.


and

(B) Descriptive praise. (God is…does…)
Psa 103:1-6 A Psalm of David.
Bless the LORD, O my soul; And all that is within me, bless His holy name!

Bless the LORD, O my soul, And forget not all His benefits:
Who forgives all your iniquities, Who heals all your diseases,
Who redeems your life from destruction,
Who crowns you with loving kindness and tender mercies,
Who satisfies your mouth with good things, So that your youth is renewed like the eagle’s.

The LORD executes righteousness And justice for all who are oppressed.


III. Psalm of Lament of the individual
Psa 13:1
To the Chief Musician. A Psalm of David.
How long, O LORD? Will You forget me forever?
How long will You hide Your face from me?


IV. Psalm of Lament of the people
Psa 74:1 A Contemplation of Asaph.
O God, why have You cast us off forever?
Why does Your anger smoke against the sheep of Your pasture?



There is a relationship between the Lament of the People and praise to God within a psalm which are seen in three motifs.

You will find that, when a Psalm is about bad times, there will be a petition to God to deliver the people, to forgive them and to restore them to their former state of peace and blessing. That petition is commonly followed by a promise to praise God, to offer sacrifices, and to keep His commands.

1. Reference to God’s saving deeds in the past.

Psa 107:19-20 Then they cried out to the LORD in their trouble,
And He saved them out of their distresses.
He sent His word and healed them, And delivered them from their destructions.

2. A confession of trust is found between the lament (what’s going wrong) and the petition (what the people ask God to do in their behalf.)

Psa 74:12 For God is my King from of old, Working salvation in the midst of the earth.

3. The vow of praise.

Psa 80:18 Then we will not turn back from You; Revive us, and we will call upon Your name.

Psa 43:4 Then I will go to the altar of God, To God my exceeding joy;
And on the harp I will praise You, O God, my God.


Psa 51:14 Deliver me from the guilt of bloodshed, O God, The God of my salvation,
And my tongue shall sing aloud of Your righteousness.



I have heard people say how they love the Psalms because of the sweet spirit in them and the ability of the Psalms to lift you up. This is true. However, many of the Psalms express the anguish of the author who is in peril, grief, or sorrow.

There is no human emotion that may not properly be brought before God, even bitterness and deep desire for revenge.

Consider Psalm 137. It is written during the exile of Judea to Babylon. The writer pours out his anguish before the Lord.

By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat down, yea, we wept when we remembered Zion.
We hung our harps upon the willows in the midst of it.
For there those who carried us away captive asked of us a song,
And those who plundered us requested mirth, saying, “Sing us one of the songs of Zion!”

How shall we sing the LORD’s song in a foreign land?
The Babylonians torment them by mockingly asking them to sing a song about the glories of Zion which those people have destroyed and plundered and defiled.

If I forget you, O Jerusalem, let my right hand forget its skill!
If I do not remember you, let my tongue cling to the roof of my mouth—
If I do not exalt Jerusalem above my chief joy.

But the Jewish exiles hold the memory of Zion dear in their hearts.

Remember, O LORD, against the sons of Edom the day of Jerusalem,
Who said, “Raze it, raze it, to its very foundation!”

They ask the Lord to deal harshly with those who watched the destruction of Jerusalem with delight.

O daughter of Babylon, who are to be destroyed,
Happy the one who repays you as you have served us!
Happy the one who takes and dashes your little ones against the rock!


They look forward to the time, that they know is coming, when the Babylonians will suffer the same anguish that they did when the armies of Nebuchadnezzar committed atrocities upon the defenseless people of Jerusalem, slaughtering women and infants alike. The exiled Jew takes some comfort in knowing that, the evil and horror that the Babylonians did to the people of Judea will be done to them. It's like saying, "You're gonna get yours! And then I'll laugh at YOU!"

OK.

So that’s a bit of background material.

Hope it was of some benefit.
awesome
 
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