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Growth Introspection

netchaplain

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I'm glad this subject came up again. I used to think of faith as an appendage like an arm that a person could exercise to grow by means of free will, and that if I exercised such faith that I could divine God's power and wield it like a wizard (in that imagery). But God's word and the Holy Spirit duly corrected me. I found out that faith is an underlying trust in God such that one's life is centered around what God said. And I have been discovering more and more that other people like myself understand that faith is the gift of God.
I agree, the trust is the faith and is given as an internal knowing or confirmation, i.e. the Spirit always assuring a conscious knowing "that we are the children of God" (Rom 8:16). It's the same concerning our growth in our faith (salvation is an unalterable constant and does not admit in degrees as faith does), we cannot work-up a belief or an understanding that the Spirit has not yet given us, as we walk only in what He teaches us at the time, no more and no less. He's always preparing us to learn, and it's always in increments.

Blessings!
 

K2CHRIST

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I kind of like the OP. Good for some thought. So a couple of things:

2 Pet 1:3 as His divine power has given to us all things that pertain to life and godliness, through the knowledge of Him who called us by glory and virtue,

I like this verse quoted, but I have a thought on the "through the knowledge of Him", part of this verse. That is, divine power has been given to us in all things that pertain to life and godliness, but it is important to understand that is comes through the knowledge of Him. Too often it seems people focus on Christians having diving power but they fail to realize that it come through the knowledge of Him. That is to say, if I know Him and listen to Him, and do what He tells me; then I have the divine power backing me up! So it is not enough to think I have divine power, I have to know Him also! I am not sure that concept is presented.

I also have a thought on Gal 5: 22 But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, longsuffering, kindness, goodness, faithfulness,

It actually does not say 'faith' but rather 'faithfulness'. Is there not a difference? I might have a faithful dog, but I can't say the dog has any faith. I might even say the Pharisees and Sadducees were faithful, in that they made it there lives work to serve God, at least in their own mind, but they seemed to lack the belief or faith that God was really around, or why didn't they seek Him. In their mind, it seem that they believe God was in a far off place called heaven, so that they could be faithful, in their own minds at least, but lack faith in the existence of a God known as 'I Am'. Of course the Spirit wouldn't give them that impression, but people could be confused and Gal 5:22 might not mean faith but faithfulness in the true meaning.
 

netchaplain

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2 Pet 1:3 as His divine power has given to us all things that pertain to life and godliness, through the knowledge of Him who called us by glory and virtue,

I like this verse quoted, but I have a thought on the "through the knowledge of Him", part of this verse. That is, divine power has been given to us in all things that pertain to life and godliness

but it is important to understand that is comes through the knowledge of Him.
Hi and appreciate your reply and comments! I agree that the key in this verse is understanding it's all "through the knowledge" of the Father's "calling us to glory." Concerning "divine power," it is not said to be given to us but that this power has bestowed life (eternal) and godliness.

This is similar to what is in the following verse: "partakers of the divine nature." I believe we are partakers of the divine nature via its provision--which is being conformed by it through the Spirit, because it is after Christ's image (Col 3:10). Partaker of the benefits from the nature which is divine, but not partakers of the divinity, which exists only within God.

I also have a thought on Gal 5: 22 But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, longsuffering, kindness, goodness, faithfulness. It actually does not say 'faith' but rather 'faithfulness'. Is there not a difference?
I would say that faith produces faithfulness, but faithfulness does not produce faith for there first must be faith to effect being faithful. This is why I prefer the literal rendering "faith" (YLT; KJV; Web).

I see faithfulness (related to "fidelity") more accurately applied in passages like Titus 2:10; "shewing all good fidelity (faithfulness), i.e. produced from being "sound in the faith" (2:2).

I like your communication manors and thanks!

God's blessings to your Family!
 

K2CHRIST

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I would say that faith produces faithfulness, but faithfulness does not produce faith for there first must be faith to effect being faithful. This is why I prefer the literal rendering "faith" (YLT; KJV; Web).
I kind of agree the faith tends to produce faithfulness, but their is something written about faith without works being dead, and the question of will that kind of faith save you. So there is a type of faith that does not save you. And also, there might be other things beside faith that produce faithfulness. For example, I might be faithful to my work because it pays me. So if my work was say, being a preacher or pastor, then I might be faithful (or at least seem faithful) because I am getting paid. Other things beside money or the Spirit of God, might also produce faithfulness. Fame and recognition might do the trick. That is someone might go around preaching the Bible and other works so people will pay attention to them.

Now I will hear the Lord talk to me via the Holy Spirit like this morning when He woke me up with the words "Son, it is time to get up." He knows me and I know Him. So then later He tells me to go do things for Him, and I might do them because I hear Him and know Him. There is that kind of faithfulness which is based only on knowing Him. And I find that when I do go and do the things He tells me, often divine power tends to show up to help me with tasks He has me doing.

"through the knowledge"
2 Peter 1:3 as His divine power has given to us all things that pertain to life and godliness, through the knowledge of Him who called us by glory and virtue,

So I read a verse like the above, know that He call me, like when He got me up this morning by saying "Son, it is time to get up now," and because I believe it is Him, the Lord, I get up and tend to do the things He tells me, which produces a type of faithfulness, not a faithfulness based upon money or recognition, but a faithfulness based upon my knowledge of Him who called me by His Spirit. And sometimes His divine power shows up, like when I am working in the healing ministry that He has had me work in.

It all seems pretty simple to me. I know God. He tells me what to do. I do it. And He provides His divine power as needed. What I don't understand is all the big puffy extravagant words used to describe that simple concept of knowing the Lord and doing what He tells you.
 

netchaplain

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I kind of agree the faith tends to produce faithfulness, but their is something written about faith without works being dead

Thanks for the involved reply, and I appreciate your sincerity for the truths of the Scriptures! Concerning "faith without works," I see it as a simile to express the impossibility of having faith and no works (fruit of the Spirit), same illustration that "faith without works is dead," i.e. is nonexistent, as a dead body manifests one who no longer exists in this life.


Thus, dead faith is intended as no faith. In Scripture I only see one type of faith--saving faith--which always manifests (not produces) God's work (fruit). Granted that mere outward appearance of a work of God does not confirm faith, but we are discussing existing faith, not a false professing faith which is absent of God within.

Blessings!
 

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