Christian Forums

This is a sample guest message. Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

  • Focus on the Family

    Strengthening families through biblical principles.

    Focus on the Family addresses the use of biblical principles in parenting and marriage to strengthen the family.

  • The Gospel of Jesus Christ

    Heard of "The Gospel"? Want to know more?

    There is salvation in no other, for there is not another name under heaven having been given among men, by which it behooves us to be saved."

  • Site Restructuring

    The site is currently undergoing some restructuring, which will take some time. Sorry for the inconvenience if things are a little hard to find right now.

    Please let us know if you find any new problems with the way things work and we will get them fixed. You can always report any problems or difficulty finding something in the Talk With The Staff / Report a site issue forum.

By faith

Ah, but it takes faith.
Faith is not a work.
Your faith comes from God.
Faith or trusting in God is the work for you assigned to you by God. The idea isn't that God is doing this for you in John 6:29.

This is a little deeper, but it helps clarify the correct understanding. The word for "believe" in John 6:29 is a verb in the present simple active voice. It means the subject of the verb (which would be you the one believing) is the one performing the believing. God isn't doing the believing for us.
 
The idea isn't that God is doing this for you in John 6:29.

This is a little deeper, but it helps clarify the correct understanding. The word for "believe" in John 6:29 is a verb in the present simple active voice. It means the subject of the verb (which would be you the one believing) is the one performing the believing. God isn't doing the believing for us.
John 6: 29Jesus replied, “The work of God is this: to believe in the One He has sent.”

I agree that God is not doing the believing for you. What is meant by the verse is God is the CAUSE (doing the work to cause) of you believing; similar to a carpenter causing a hammer to strike a nail. The hammer is striking the nail, but it is the carpenter doing the work to cause the hammer to strike the nail.
 
John 6: 29Jesus replied, “The work of God is this: to believe in the One He has sent.”

I agree that God is not doing the believing for you. What is meant by the verse is God is the CAUSE (doing the work to cause) of you believing; similar to a carpenter causing a hammer to strike a nail. The hammer is striking the nail, but it is the carpenter doing the work to cause the hammer to strike the nail.
They asked in the previous verse “What must we do to perform the works of God?” After that, Jesus told them what to do to perform the works of God or God's work. In verse 35 Jesus said “Whoever comes to Me will never hunger, and whoever believes in Me will never thirst." So what the context reveals is coming to Jesus and believing. I still say the work of God is something they are doing. The whole context is a comparison between Jesus and the manna. The Israelites had to actually go out and collect the manna, refine it, and eat it. God didn't do anything for them except provide it. Same with Jesus the "bread from heaven."
 
John 6: 29Jesus replied, “The work of God is this: to believe in the One He has sent.”

I agree that God is not doing the believing for you. What is meant by the verse is God is the CAUSE (doing the work to cause) of you believing; similar to a carpenter causing a hammer to strike a nail. The hammer is striking the nail, but it is the carpenter doing the work to cause the hammer to strike the nail.
John 6:29 (Lexham English Bible):
"Jesus replied, 'This is the work of God: that you believe in the one whom he has sent.'"

Greek Text (NA28):
"Ἀπεκρίθη Ἰησοῦς καὶ εἶπεν αὐτοῖς, Τοῦτό ἐστιν τὸ ἔργον τοῦ Θεοῦ, ἵνα πιστεύητε εἰς ὃν ἀπέστειλεν ἐκεῖνος."

Morphological Analysis:
Ἀπεκρίθη (apekrithē): Aorist passive indicative, third person singular of ἀποκρίνομαι, meaning "he answered" or "he replied."
Ἰησοῦς (Iēsous): Nominative singular masculine, the subject "Jesus."
καὶ (kai): Coordinating conjunction, meaning "and."
εἶπεν (eipen): Aorist active indicative, third person singular of λέγω, meaning "he said."
αὐτοῖς (autois): Dative plural of αὐτός, meaning "to them."
Τοῦτό (touto): Demonstrative pronoun, nominative singular neuter, meaning "this."
ἐστιν (estin): Present active indicative, third person singular of εἰμί, meaning "is."

τὸ ἔργον (to ergon): Nominative singular neuter, meaning "the work."

τοῦ Θεοῦ (tou Theou): Genitive singular masculine, meaning "of God."

ἵνα (hina): Conjunction, introducing a purpose clause, meaning "that."

πιστεύητε (pisteuēte): Present active subjunctive, second person plural of πιστεύω, meaning "you believe."
εἰς (eis): Preposition, meaning "in" or "into."


ὃν (hon): Relative pronoun, accusative singular masculine, meaning "whom."

ἀπέστειλεν (apesteilen): Aorist active indicative, third person singular of ἀποστέλλω, meaning "he has sent."

ἐκεῖνος (ekeinos): Demonstrative pronoun, nominative singular masculine, meaning "that one" or "he."
Syntactic Force:
Main Clause:

Ἀπεκρίθη Ἰησοῦς καὶ εἶπεν αὐτοῖς: "Jesus replied and said to them." This introductory clause sets the scene for Jesus’ statement and identifies Him as the speaker.
Identification of the Subject:

Τοῦτό ἐστιν τὸ ἔργον τοῦ Θεοῦ: "This is the work of God." The demonstrative pronoun "Τοῦτό" (This) emphasizes the focus of the statement. The verb "ἐστιν" (is) connects the subject "Τοῦτό" (This) with the predicate nominative "τὸ ἔργον τοῦ Θεοῦ" (the work of God).
Purpose Clause:

ἵνα πιστεύητε εἰς ὃν ἀπέστειλεν ἐκεῖνος: "that you believe in the one whom he has sent." The conjunction "ἵνα" (that) introduces a purpose clause, explaining the content or result of the "work of God." The verb "πιστεύητε" (you believe) is in the present subjunctive, indicating an ongoing action or state of belief. The phrase "εἰς ὃν ἀπέστειλεν ἐκεῖνος" specifies the object of belief, "the one whom he has sent."
Theological and Exegetical Implications:
Definition of the Work of God:

Jesus redefines the traditional Jewish understanding of "works" necessary for righteousness. Instead of multiple works or adherence to the law, He simplifies it to a single "work" — believing in Him, the one sent by God.
Present Subjunctive Force:

The use of the present subjunctive "πιστεύητε" (you believe) implies continuous action, suggesting that believing in Jesus is not a one-time event but an ongoing relationship and trust in Him.
Focus on Jesus as Sent by God:

The relative clause "ὃν ἀπέστειλεν ἐκεῖνος" (whom he has sent) emphasizes Jesus' divine mission and origin, affirming His authority and the necessity of faith in Him.
Contrast with Human Works:

This statement contrasts human efforts to earn salvation through works with the divine requirement of faith in Jesus. It underscores the grace-based nature of salvation.
Cross-References:
John 3:16:

"For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life."
Emphasizes belief in Jesus as the key to eternal life.
John 5:24:

"Very truly I tell you, whoever hears my word and believes him who sent me has eternal life and will not be judged but has crossed over from death to life."
Highlights the importance of believing in Jesus and His divine sender for eternal life.
John 20:31:

"But these are written that you may believe that Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God, and that by believing you may have life in his name."
The purpose of John's Gospel is to lead readers to faith in Jesus, resulting in eternal life.
Conclusion:

John 6:29 reveals a profound theological truth that the primary work God requires is not a series of ritualistic actions but a singular, ongoing faith in Jesus Christ, whom God has sent. This faith is an active, continuous trust and reliance on Jesus, acknowledging His divine mission and the salvation He brings. This passage, when analyzed with its Greek morphology and syntactic structure, underscores the simplicity yet profoundness of the gospel message—salvation through faith in Christ alone.

Immediate Context (John 6:22-40)
Background Events:
Feeding of the Five Thousand (John 6:1-15):

Jesus performs the miracle of feeding a large crowd with five barley loaves and two fish. This miracle showcases Jesus’ divine provision and foreshadows spiritual nourishment.
Walking on Water (John 6:16-21):

Jesus walks on water to meet His disciples during a storm on the Sea of Galilee. This miracle demonstrates His authority over nature and His divine identity.
The Crowd’s Search for Jesus (John 6:22-25):
The next day, the crowd that had been fed realizes Jesus is no longer there. They travel to Capernaum, seeking Him.
The Bread of Life Discourse (John 6:26-59)
Initial Conversation (John 6:26-29):

John 6:26-27: Jesus confronts the crowd for seeking Him not because of the signs, but because they were filled with bread. He urges them to seek the food that endures to eternal life, which He, the Son of Man, will give.

John 6:28: The crowd asks, “What must we do to do the works God requires?”

John 6:29: Jesus replies, “The work of God is this: to believe in the One He has sent.”
Detailed Context:
Spiritual vs. Physical Needs:

Jesus redirects the crowd's focus from physical bread to spiritual sustenance, highlighting the deeper need for eternal life and salvation.

The Crowd’s Question and Jesus’ Response:

The crowd’s question reflects a common Jewish concern with performing works to fulfill God’s requirements. They seek a list of actions or rituals to earn God’s favor.

Jesus’ response simplifies and redefines the concept of “work” in relation to salvation. He emphasizes faith in Himself as the essential and singular “work” that pleases God.
Broader Context (John 6:30-59)
Continued Dialogue:
John 6:30-31: The crowd asks for a sign, referencing the manna given to their ancestors.
John 6:32-33: Jesus explains that the true bread from heaven is not the manna but the One who gives life to the world.
John 6:34-35: Jesus declares, “I am the bread of life. Whoever comes to me will never go hungry, and whoever believes in me will never be thirsty.”
John 6:36-40: Jesus explains His mission to do the will of the Father, which is that everyone who looks to the Son and believes in Him shall have eternal life.
Key Themes and Theological Implications:
Faith as the Central Work:

The emphasis on belief in Jesus as the essential “work” underscores the shift from a works-based to a faith-based relationship with God.
Divine Provision and Identity:

The miracles (feeding the 5,000, walking on water) and the discourse collectively affirm Jesus’ identity as the divine provider and the source of eternal life.
Contrast with Old Testament Manna:

Jesus contrasts Himself with the manna given to the Israelites, presenting Himself as the superior, life-giving bread from heaven.
Eternal Life through Belief:

The recurrent theme is that eternal life is granted through faith in Jesus, highlighting the necessity and sufficiency of believing in Him.
Cross-References:
John 3:16-18:

Emphasizes the importance of belief in Jesus for eternal life and the consequences of unbelief.
“For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life.”
John 5:24:

“Very truly I tell you, whoever hears my word and believes him who sent me has eternal life and will not be judged but has crossed over from death to life.”
Reinforces the necessity of believing in Jesus for eternal life.
Hebrews 11:6:

“And without faith it is impossible to please God, because anyone who comes to him must believe that he exists and that he rewards those who earnestly seek him.”
Highlights the foundational role of faith in pleasing God.
Conclusion:
John 6:29, within its immediate and broader context, clarifies that the primary “work” God requires is faith in Jesus Christ. This response by Jesus reorients the traditional understanding of religious works, emphasizing faith as the key to receiving eternal life. The surrounding narrative, including the miraculous signs and Jesus’ teachings, serves to authenticate His identity and mission, underscoring the necessity of believing in Him. The broader scriptural context supports this message, consistently presenting faith in Jesus as the central requirement for salvation and a relationship with God.

God bless
J.
 
Hebrew:
"Faith" (אֱמוּנָה, emunah): Denotes faithfulness, trustworthiness, or fidelity. It stems from the root אָמַן (aman), meaning "to support," "to confirm," or "to be faithful."

Greek:
"Faith" (πίστις, pistis): Refers to trust, belief, or confidence. It denotes a firm persuasion or conviction concerning something or someone.

"By" (διά, dia): Indicates the means, manner, or instrumentality by which an action is accomplished. It can also denote causality or agency.

2. Exegetical Analysis:
Syntax and Morphology:

In Greek, the phrase "by faith" is typically expressed as διὰ πίστεως (dia pisteōs), where διὰ (dia) functions as a preposition meaning "through" or "by," and πίστεως (pisteōs) is the genitive form of πίστις (pistis), meaning "faith."
The genitive case indicates possession or source, suggesting that faith is the means or instrumentality through which something is accomplished or achieved.
Biblical References:
Romans 3:28 (NKJV): "Therefore we conclude that a man is justified by faith apart from the deeds of the law."

Here, "by faith" (διὰ πίστεως, dia pisteōs) signifies that justification is achieved or accomplished through faith, apart from the works of the law.

Hebrews 11:6 (NKJV): "But without faith it is impossible to please Him, for he who comes to God must believe that He is, and that He is a rewarder of those who diligently seek Him."

The phrase "without faith" emphasizes the necessity of faith in pleasing God and approaching Him. Faith is the means by which individuals believe in God's existence and trust in His promises.

Conclusion:
The phrase "by faith" conveys the idea that faith is the means or instrumentality through which certain spiritual realities are attained or experienced.
Faith involves trust, conviction, and reliance on God and His promises, leading to justification, pleasing God, and experiencing His blessings.
Understanding the nuances of the original Hebrew and Greek terms, as well as their syntactical and morphological usage, enhances our comprehension of the significance of faith in the Christian life and its role in salvation and relationship with God.

J.

Yes, I am familiar with what the "definitions" from Hebrew and greek lexicons say. These may (or may not) be a good place to start with getting a deeper understanding of the original meaning of a biblical word.


However, when the bible itself defines for us, the meaning of a word, we should always include this meaning in our study as a foundational concept, so when we see subtle nuances from a man made resource, we can have a biblical waypoint to guide our understanding.


Everything in the natural world finds its beginning in the substance of faith; from the invisible substance of God’s faith.


Biblical definition of faith.

Now faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen. For by it the elders obtained a good testimony. By faith we understand that the worlds were framed by the word of God, so that the things which are seen were not made of things which are visible.
Hebrews 11:1-3
 
Conclusion:

John 6:29 reveals a profound theological truth that the primary work God requires is not a series of ritualistic actions but a singular, ongoing faith in Jesus Christ, whom God has sent. This faith is an active, continuous trust and reliance on Jesus, acknowledging His divine mission and the salvation He brings. This passage, when analyzed with its Greek morphology and syntactic structure, underscores the simplicity yet profoundness of the gospel message—salvation through faith in Christ alone.
Agreed. (although my Greek is useless)
.... and the cause of one believing salvificly is:
A) God alone (monergistic) or
B) God and man (synergistic) ?
 
Now faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen. For by it the elders obtained a good testimony. By faith we understand that the worlds were framed by the word of God, so that the things which are seen were not made of things which are visible.
Hebrews 11:1-3
Right-now since you know the "definitions" can you exegete this one verse theology for me? Since I don't epignosko what emunah is-care to explain faithfulness to me since it comes across as a Drash, or maybe a Sod?

I need context and some cross referencing.
Thanks
J.
 
Technically, faith is a work. It is the work of God.
John 6:29 Jesus replied, “The work of God is this: to believe in the One He has sent.”

Good post.

Actually, the scripture says believe is a work of God.

Faith is a gift from God, as well as grace.

The word by faith literally means God spoke to, inspired, or moved upon a person and they obeyed what He said to them.

Example:

And suddenly, a woman who had a flow of blood for twelve years came from behind and touched the hem of His garment. For she said to herself, “If only I may touch His garment, I shall be made well.” But Jesus turned around, and when He saw her He said, “Be of good cheer, daughter; your faith has made you well.” And the woman was made well from that hour. Matthew 9:20-22

Faith came to her from God as He spoke to her to go and touch the hem of His garment.

When she responded in obedience, her faith was activated to produce the intended divine result of healing her.

Without her obedience her faith she received when God spoke to her, would remain dormant or dead; inactive and unable to produce the intended result of healing.

This dynamic principle of faith is called: The obedience of faith.

But now is made manifest, and by the scriptures of the prophets, according to the commandment of the everlasting God, made known to all nations for the obedience of faith: Romans 16:26
 
Scripture alone is largely misunderstood. It isn't "Scripture is the only authority;" it's '"only Scripture, because it is God’s inspired Word, is our inerrant, sufficient, and final authority for the church'." It's the only infallible authority.

2Ti 3:16 All Scripture is breathed out by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness,
2Ti 3:17 that the man of God may be complete, equipped for every good work. (ESV)

Act 17:11 Now these Jews were more noble than those in Thessalonica; they received the word with all eagerness, examining the Scriptures daily to see if these things were so. (ESV)
Is that the standard? It’s God breathed?

How did they receive the word since the New Testament was not written yet?

Who is the “Man of God”?

Thks
 
How did they receive the word since the New Testament was not written yet?
The Bible that Jesus and His disciples read was primarily the Hebrew Scriptures, known as the Tanakh. However, by the time of Jesus, the Hebrew Scriptures were also widely available in a Greek translation known as the Septuagint (LXX). Here's a detailed breakdown:

The Hebrew Scriptures (Tanakh)
The Hebrew Scriptures, or the Tanakh, consist of three main parts:

Torah (Law): The first five books (Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy).
Nevi'im (Prophets): This includes the Former Prophets (Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings) and the Latter Prophets (Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and the Twelve Minor Prophets).
Ketuvim (Writings): A diverse collection including Psalms, Proverbs, Job, Song of Solomon, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, Esther, Daniel, Ezra-Nehemiah, and Chronicles.
The Septuagint (LXX)
The Septuagint is a Greek translation of the Hebrew Scriptures, completed by Jewish scholars in Alexandria around the 3rd to 2nd centuries BCE. It was widely used by Jews in the Diaspora who spoke Greek. The Septuagint includes some books that are not found in the Hebrew Bible but are part of the Apocrypha.

Evidence of Usage
Jesus' Quotations:

Jesus often quoted from the Hebrew Scriptures. For example, in the synagogue at Nazareth, Jesus reads from the scroll of Isaiah (Luke 4:16-21).
Many of Jesus' quotations align closely with the Septuagint wording, suggesting He and the Gospel writers were familiar with and used this translation. An example is Jesus quoting Isaiah 61:1-2 in Luke 4:18-19.
New Testament Citations:

The New Testament writers frequently quote the Old Testament, and many of these quotations match the Septuagint rather than the Hebrew Masoretic Text. For example, the writer of Hebrews often quotes from the Septuagint (Hebrews 1:6, 10:5-7).
Jewish Practice:

In Judea, the Hebrew Scriptures would have been used primarily, especially in liturgical settings such as the synagogue.
In Hellenistic Jewish communities, the Septuagint was more commonly used.
Specific Examples
Matthew 21:42:

Jesus quotes Psalm 118:22-23, "The stone the builders rejected has become the cornerstone." This matches both the Hebrew and Septuagint texts.
Acts 2:17-21:

Peter quotes Joel 2:28-32 during his Pentecost sermon. The wording aligns closely with the Septuagint.
Romans 3:10-18:

Paul combines several Old Testament passages, many aligning more closely with the Septuagint than the Hebrew Masoretic Text.
Conclusion
The Bible that Jesus and His disciples read was the Hebrew Scriptures, known as the Tanakh. In addition, they were familiar with and frequently used the Septuagint, the Greek translation of these scriptures. The use of both the Hebrew text and the Septuagint in the New Testament illustrates the bilingual and multicultural context of the early Christian community. The widespread use of the Septuagint in the New Testament indicates its significance and influence in the early Church.

Hope this is helpful!
J.
 
Basically are these doctrines supported by the New Testament

But the rule of faith for Christians is not scripture alone

We must believe and obey both Christ and the church He founded on the apostles (Matt 16:18-19) to teach and sanctify all men unto eternal salvation! (Matt 28:19)

(Not scripture alone)
Sacred Scripture according to the churches cannon and interpretation? Yes!
Scripture alone? No!

Heb 1:1 God, who at sundry times and in divers manners spake in time past unto the fathers by the prophets,

2 Hath in these last days spoken unto us by his Son, whom he hath appointed heir of all things by, by whom also he made the worlds;

“Not by scripture alone”!

That’s the nail in the coffin of “Sola scriptura” it is dead and buried, “false doctrine” the doctrine of demons like all the sola’s!
It’s

For the law was given by Moses, but grace and truth came by Jesus Christ. Jn 1:17

Jesus Christ is the way, the truth, and the life! Jn 14:6

And this extends to His apostolic church, Christ and His church are one and inseparable! Acts 9:4 Jn 15:5 eph 5:32 acts 2:42

One shepherd and one fold! Jn 10:16

The truth of the Christian faith and the church are of divine origin and cannot be reformed!

Jesus Christ is the Light of the world! Jn 8:12
Apostolic church the light of the world! Matt 5:14

Must Hear Jesus Christ! Matt 17:5
Acts 3:23
Must Hear the apostolic church! Matt 18:17 1 Jn 4:6

Authority of Jesus Christ! Matt 28:17
Authority of the apostles! Jn 20:21

Jesus Christ has Reconciliation!
2 cor 5:19
Apostles have ministry of Reconciliation! 2 cor 5:18

Jesus Christ have power to forgive mens sins! Lk 5:20 Jn
Apostles have power to forgive mens sins! Jn 20:23

Jesus Christ is the truth! Jn 14:6
The apostolic church is the pillar of truth! 1 Tim 3:16

For the apostolic authority in Holy church decided and decreed (bound on earth / bound in heaven) the canon of Scripture, and is the only authentic interpreter of scripture!

The Christian faith is revealed by Christ!

Jesus Christ before ascending to heaven gave His apostles the fullness of truth, the apostolic church our mother and teacher is commanded by Him to teach and to sanctify with her sacraments (the promise of the spirit) all men unto eternal salvation! We are commanded to believe and obey! Matt 28:19

How can the Protestant concept: “sacred scripture is the only infallible source of truth” be true? There must be some infallible source that must tell us what is the canon of scripture & has authority to interpret scripture!

It is impossible to reject the church or her teaching without rejecting Christ who founded the church and revealed her teaching!

You cannot reject the kingdom established by the king and say I obey and submit to the king!

Jesus Christ founded the new covenant church to teach and sanctify (baptize) all men unto eternal salvation! (Matt 28:19)

Christ and His church are one!
((Inseparable unity))
Acts 9:4 Lk 10:16 eph 5:32 Isa 53:5 Jn 15:5 eph 5:24

Only Christ has authority to establish the church! Matt 16:18-19
One church! Jn 10:16 All others are sects “full of errors” “the tradition of men”! The new covenant Church is the eternal city of God! Household of faith! The pillar and ground of TRUTH! 1 Tim 3:15 Founded by Christ alone! Matt 16:18 on Peter and the apostles! Eph 2:20 Lk 22:29

Thks
Hey All,
The church can be wrong.
The Crusades were wrong.
Putting Galaleo on trial because he said the earth revolves around the Sun was wrong.
The recent sexual assault by some leaders in the Catholic Church upon children was wrong.
Then trying to cover it up was a second wrong.
Calling someone father who is not God or your father is wrong.

Matthew 23:9 And call no man your father upon the earth: for one is your Father, which is in heaven.

That is a clear wrong.
Why do you do what you know is wrong.

Scripture is never wrong.
Therefore Scripture is superior to all human resolutions.
We who believe are trusting it with our lives.

Keep walking everybody.
May God bless,
Taz
 
Is that the standard? It’s God breathed?

How did they receive the word since the New Testament was not written yet?

Who is the “Man of God”?

Thks
Hey All,
The Old Testament is Scripture also, is it not Mr. Adams?
And it was complete
One can teach Jesus all day long out of the Old Testament.

Keep walking everybody.
May God bless,
Taz
 
I have to smile @Fastfredy0--this is a "curvefball" I mean, do I lean to Reformed theology, or "freewill?"
*giggle* ... you haven't been shy so far to express an opinion. You're obviously knowledgeable and well written so I hope you're on my side.... *giggle* ..... so far we seem to be in agreement (2 can't walk together unless they ...)

Aside: Most people can't define "free will" to a degree that one could interrogate further.

I'm a monergist, 5 solas.
 
*giggle* ... you haven't been shy so far to express an opinion. You're obviously knowledgeable and well written so I hope you're on my side.... *giggle* ..... so far we seem to be in agreement (2 can't walk together unless they ...)

Aside: Most people can't define "free will" to a degree that one could interrogate further.

I'm a monergist, 5 solas.
No problem Fastfredy0
Johann.
 
The Bible that Jesus and His disciples read was primarily the Hebrew Scriptures, known as the Tanakh. However, by the time of Jesus, the Hebrew Scriptures were also widely available in a Greek translation known as the Septuagint (LXX). Here's a detailed breakdown:

The Hebrew Scriptures (Tanakh)
The Hebrew Scriptures, or the Tanakh, consist of three main parts:

Torah (Law): The first five books (Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy).
Nevi'im (Prophets): This includes the Former Prophets (Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings) and the Latter Prophets (Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and the Twelve Minor Prophets).
Ketuvim (Writings): A diverse collection including Psalms, Proverbs, Job, Song of Solomon, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, Esther, Daniel, Ezra-Nehemiah, and Chronicles.
The Septuagint (LXX)
The Septuagint is a Greek translation of the Hebrew Scriptures, completed by Jewish scholars in Alexandria around the 3rd to 2nd centuries BCE. It was widely used by Jews in the Diaspora who spoke Greek. The Septuagint includes some books that are not found in the Hebrew Bible but are part of the Apocrypha.

Evidence of Usage
Jesus' Quotations:

Jesus often quoted from the Hebrew Scriptures. For example, in the synagogue at Nazareth, Jesus reads from the scroll of Isaiah (Luke 4:16-21).
Many of Jesus' quotations align closely with the Septuagint wording, suggesting He and the Gospel writers were familiar with and used this translation. An example is Jesus quoting Isaiah 61:1-2 in Luke 4:18-19.
New Testament Citations:

The New Testament writers frequently quote the Old Testament, and many of these quotations match the Septuagint rather than the Hebrew Masoretic Text. For example, the writer of Hebrews often quotes from the Septuagint (Hebrews 1:6, 10:5-7).
Jewish Practice:

In Judea, the Hebrew Scriptures would have been used primarily, especially in liturgical settings such as the synagogue.
In Hellenistic Jewish communities, the Septuagint was more commonly used.
Specific Examples
Matthew 21:42:

Jesus quotes Psalm 118:22-23, "The stone the builders rejected has become the cornerstone." This matches both the Hebrew and Septuagint texts.
Acts 2:17-21:

Peter quotes Joel 2:28-32 during his Pentecost sermon. The wording aligns closely with the Septuagint.
Romans 3:10-18:

Paul combines several Old Testament passages, many aligning more closely with the Septuagint than the Hebrew Masoretic Text.
Conclusion
The Bible that Jesus and His disciples read was the Hebrew Scriptures, known as the Tanakh. In addition, they were familiar with and frequently used the Septuagint, the Greek translation of these scriptures. The use of both the Hebrew text and the Septuagint in the New Testament illustrates the bilingual and multicultural context of the early Christian community. The widespread use of the Septuagint in the New Testament indicates its significance and influence in the early Church.

Hope this is helpful!
J.
Thanks

Here’s the authorized list

Council of Trent!

Authorized books of Sacred
Scripture!

They are the following:

Of the Old Testament, the five books of Moses, namely, Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy; Josue, Judges, Ruth, the four books of Kings, two of Paralipomenon, the first and second of Esdras, the latter of which is called Nehemias, Tobias, Judith, Esther, Job, the Davidic Psalter of 150 Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, the Canticle of Canticles, Wisdom, Ecclesiasticus, Isaias, Jeremias, with Baruch, Ezechiel, Daniel, the twelve minor Prophets, namely, Osee, Joel, Amos, Abdias, Jonas, Micheas, Nahum, Habacuc, Sophonias, Aggeus, Zacharias, Malachias; two books of Machabees, the first and second.

Of the New Testament, the four Gospels, according to Matthew, Mark, Luke and John; the Acts of the Apostles written by Luke the Evangelist; fourteen Epistles of Paul the Apostle, to the Romans, two to the Corinthians, to the Galatians, to the Ephesians, to the Philippians, to the Colossians, two to the Thessalonians, two to Timothy, to Titus, to Philemon, to the Hebrews; two of Peter the Apostle, three of John the Apostle, one of James the Apostle, one of Jude the Apostle, and the Apocalypse of John the Apostle.

If anyone does not accept as sacred and canonical the aforesaid books in their entirety and with all their parts, as they have been accustomed to be read in the Catholic Church and as they are contained in the old Latin Vulgate Edition, and knowingly and deliberately rejects the aforesaid traditions, let him be anathema.
 
Right-now since you know the "definitions" can you exegete this one verse theology for me? Since I don't epignosko what emunah is-care to explain faithfulness to me since it comes across as a Drash, or maybe a Sod?

I need context and some cross referencing.
Thanks
J.

I don't really know what all your funny sounding words mean.

Please give some scripture with the word "theology" in it.

Did Jesus ask His disciples study "theology" or to continue in His doctrine?


What I do know is Hebrews 11 teaches us about those who operated by faith.


By faith means God spoke to a person and the person obeyed what they heard God say.

By faith Noah, being divinely warned of things not yet seen, moved with godly fear, prepared an ark for the saving of his household, by which he condemned the world and became heir of the righteousness which is according to faith. Hebrews 11:7

God spoke to Noah to build the ark and Noah moved with godly fear and obeyed.
Noah became heir to the righteousness according to faith.



By faith Abraham obeyed when he was called to go out to the place which he would receive as an inheritance. And he went out, not knowing where he was going. Hebrews 11:8

Abraham heard the call of the Gospel and obeyed, and was justified by his obedience.

This how how we obey the Gospel and are saved... by faith.

Companion Scripture:
And the Scripture, foreseeing that God would justify the Gentiles by faith, preached the gospel to Abraham beforehand, saying, “In you all the nations shall be blessed.” Galatians 3:8



JLB
 
John 6: 29Jesus replied, “The work of God is this: to believe in the One He has sent.”

I agree that God is not doing the believing for you. What is meant by the verse is God is the CAUSE (doing the work to cause) of you believing; similar to a carpenter causing a hammer to strike a nail. The hammer is striking the nail, but it is the carpenter doing the work to cause the hammer to strike the nail.
If God is CAUSING a person to believe....
then how is it that person's faith that is allowing him to be saved?

A person is saved BY GRACE
THROUGH the instrument OF FAITH

Are we saved by our faith or Jesus' faith as some believe?

If God is infusing that faith into us,,,CAUSING us to believe....
HOW is it our own faith that saves us?
 
Back
Top